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Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy

Abstract

Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy is the leading technique used in urology for the non-invasive treatment of kidney and ureteric stones. The stone is comminuted by thousands of ultrasound shocks, into fragments small enough to be naturally passed. Since the technique was introduced in the 1980 different generations of lithotripters have been developed. Nevertheless the alignment systems (x-ray, ultrasound) still have some limitations (indeed, the tighter focusing of newer lithotripter reduces the tolerance for misalignment) and there is no capability for on-line monitoring of the degree of fragmentation of the stone. There is 50% incidence of re-treatments, possibly due to these deficiencies. The objective of this research is to design a new passive acoustic sensor, exploiting the secondary acoustic emission generated during the treatment, which could be used as a diagnostic device for lithotripsy. With a passive cylindrical cavitation detector, developed by the National Physical Laboratory, it was possible to detect these emissions in a laboratory lithotripter, and it was shown that they contain information on the degree of stone fragmentation and stone location. This information could be used to perform the desired monitoring and to improve the stone targeting. In collaboration with Precision Acoustic Ltd, some clinical prototypes were developed and  More>>
Authors:
Fedele, F; [1]  Coleman, A J; [1]  Leighton, T G; [2]  White, P R; [2]  Hurrell, A M [3] 
  1. Medical Physics Department, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust, London, SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)
  2. Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)
  3. Precision Acoustics Ltd, Dorchester, DT1 1PY (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 2004
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physics. Conference Series (Online); Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: AMUM 2004: International conference on advanced metrology for ultrasound in medicine 2004, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom), 27-28 Apr 2004; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; CYLINDRICAL CONFIGURATION; FRAGMENTATION; INFORMATION; KIDNEYS; SHOCK WAVES; TOLERANCE; X RADIATION
OSTI ID:
20684194
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6596; TRN: GB05P4020003163
Availability:
Available online at http://stacks.iop.org/1742-6596/1/134/jpconf4_1_031.pdf or at the Web site for the Journal of Physics. Conference Series (Online) (ISSN 1742-6596) http://www.iop.org/;INIS
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
page(s) 134-139
Announcement Date:
Jan 21, 2006

Citation Formats

Fedele, F, Coleman, A J, Leighton, T G, White, P R, and Hurrell, A M. Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy. United Kingdom: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031.
Fedele, F, Coleman, A J, Leighton, T G, White, P R, & Hurrell, A M. Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy. United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031.
Fedele, F, Coleman, A J, Leighton, T G, White, P R, and Hurrell, A M. 2004. "Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy." United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031.
@misc{etde_20684194,
title = {Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy}
author = {Fedele, F, Coleman, A J, Leighton, T G, White, P R, and Hurrell, A M}
abstractNote = {Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy is the leading technique used in urology for the non-invasive treatment of kidney and ureteric stones. The stone is comminuted by thousands of ultrasound shocks, into fragments small enough to be naturally passed. Since the technique was introduced in the 1980 different generations of lithotripters have been developed. Nevertheless the alignment systems (x-ray, ultrasound) still have some limitations (indeed, the tighter focusing of newer lithotripter reduces the tolerance for misalignment) and there is no capability for on-line monitoring of the degree of fragmentation of the stone. There is 50% incidence of re-treatments, possibly due to these deficiencies. The objective of this research is to design a new passive acoustic sensor, exploiting the secondary acoustic emission generated during the treatment, which could be used as a diagnostic device for lithotripsy. With a passive cylindrical cavitation detector, developed by the National Physical Laboratory, it was possible to detect these emissions in a laboratory lithotripter, and it was shown that they contain information on the degree of stone fragmentation and stone location. This information could be used to perform the desired monitoring and to improve the stone targeting. In collaboration with Precision Acoustic Ltd, some clinical prototypes were developed and tested to verify the relevance of these preliminary results. Clinical results are presented.}
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/1/1/031}
journal = {Journal of Physics. Conference Series (Online)}
issue = {1}
volume = {1}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2004}
month = {Jan}
}