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Reproducibility of gas content measurements using the fast desorption technique

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

Gas content measurement is a principal tool for the assessment and management of outburst risk by the Australian underground coal industry. While the fast desorption technique is widely used for gas content measurement, concerns have been raised regarding the reproducibility of results between different laboratories. This resulted in an Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP) supported study completed in 1998. Undividual laboratories were performing well but their results were not being consistently reproduced at other laboratories, with variability of up to 17%. A further project aimed to determine the source(s) of the variability between laboratories and to propose modifications to the fast desorption test method. Possible mechanisms associated with individual laboratory practices were identified as: 1) Variable partial pressure conditions at the end of the measurement. 2) Temperature rise during crushing, creating an overestimate of gas content. 3) Dissolution of carbon dioxide in water, leading to underestimation of gas content and 4) Oxidation of the coal during the measurement, particularly in the crushing phase, most likely leading to an underestimate of gas content. It was also recognised that sampling techniques for the coal can also lead to variability in results.
Authors:
Danell, Richard; Saghafi, Abouna; Williams, Ray; Wood, Jeff [1] 
  1. BHP Billiton (Australia)
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 2003
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Reference Number:
CLA-00:010013
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Project C8024
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; INTERLABORATORY COMPARISONS; DESORPTION; ROCK BURSTS; COAL SEAMS; UNDERGROUND MINING; CONCENTRATION RATIO; GASES; DATA COVARIANCES; VARIATIONS; PARTIAL PRESSURE; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CARBON DIOXIDE; DISSOLUTION; OXIDATION; COAL; SAMPLING; MEASURING METHODS; ACCURACY; RELIABILITY; AUSTRALIA
OSTI ID:
20681207
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: 000100013
Availability:
Anne Mabardi, Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP), PO Box 7148, Riverside Centre, Qld. 4001, Australia; tel: 07 3229 7661; fax: 07 3229 0061; e-mail: anne@acarp.com.au; Internet: www.acarp.com.au
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
CD-ROM pages
Announcement Date:
Jan 09, 2006

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

Danell, Richard, Saghafi, Abouna, Williams, Ray, and Wood, Jeff. Reproducibility of gas content measurements using the fast desorption technique. Australia: N. p., 2003. Web.
Danell, Richard, Saghafi, Abouna, Williams, Ray, & Wood, Jeff. Reproducibility of gas content measurements using the fast desorption technique. Australia.
Danell, Richard, Saghafi, Abouna, Williams, Ray, and Wood, Jeff. 2003. "Reproducibility of gas content measurements using the fast desorption technique." Australia.
@misc{etde_20681207,
title = {Reproducibility of gas content measurements using the fast desorption technique}
author = {Danell, Richard, Saghafi, Abouna, Williams, Ray, and Wood, Jeff}
abstractNote = {Gas content measurement is a principal tool for the assessment and management of outburst risk by the Australian underground coal industry. While the fast desorption technique is widely used for gas content measurement, concerns have been raised regarding the reproducibility of results between different laboratories. This resulted in an Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP) supported study completed in 1998. Undividual laboratories were performing well but their results were not being consistently reproduced at other laboratories, with variability of up to 17%. A further project aimed to determine the source(s) of the variability between laboratories and to propose modifications to the fast desorption test method. Possible mechanisms associated with individual laboratory practices were identified as: 1) Variable partial pressure conditions at the end of the measurement. 2) Temperature rise during crushing, creating an overestimate of gas content. 3) Dissolution of carbon dioxide in water, leading to underestimation of gas content and 4) Oxidation of the coal during the measurement, particularly in the crushing phase, most likely leading to an underestimate of gas content. It was also recognised that sampling techniques for the coal can also lead to variability in results.}
place = {Australia}
year = {2003}
month = {Jun}
}