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Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium

Abstract

We have studied, in various culture media, how the absorption of caesium by barley varies with its concentration, and how this absorption can be in competition with a similar alkali cation-potassium. We have also considered the caesium distribution in the ground in particular radio-active caesium, between the soil and solution, as a function of the amount of caesium. From our work it is clear that barley behaves very differently according to whether the caesium is in a nutritive solution or is in the soil: for a nutritive solution, the fraction of caesium (radioactive and stable) absorbed by barley remains practically constant in the presence of increasing amounts (relatively small) of stable caesium; in soil, the fraction of the radio-active caesium absorbed increases as the stable caesium content (fairly low) of the soil increases, in relationship with a rapidly decreasing selectivity of the soil for Cs{sup +}. The difference between these results is thus explained by the very pronounced selectivity of the illitic soil studied for Cs{sup +}, as long as the proportion of Cs remains low, about as low as that of most natural soils. Furthermore, the K{sup +} ion is in competition with the Cs{sup +} ion, for absorption  More>>
Authors:
Ferron-Trosseau, F [1] 
  1. Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1964
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Report Number:
CEA-R-2708
Resource Relation:
Other Information: TH: These controle sanitaire; 70 refs
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BARLEY; CESIUM; CESIUM 133; CESIUM 137; POTASSIUM; RADIONUCLIDE KINETICS; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; RETENTION; ROOT ABSORPTION
OSTI ID:
20680208
Research Organizations:
CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)
Country of Origin:
France
Language:
French
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: FR05R2708115098
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
FRN
Size:
69 pages
Announcement Date:
Jan 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Ferron-Trosseau, F. Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium. France: N. p., 1964. Web.
Ferron-Trosseau, F. Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium. France.
Ferron-Trosseau, F. 1964. "Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium." France.
@misc{etde_20680208,
title = {Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium}
author = {Ferron-Trosseau, F}
abstractNote = {We have studied, in various culture media, how the absorption of caesium by barley varies with its concentration, and how this absorption can be in competition with a similar alkali cation-potassium. We have also considered the caesium distribution in the ground in particular radio-active caesium, between the soil and solution, as a function of the amount of caesium. From our work it is clear that barley behaves very differently according to whether the caesium is in a nutritive solution or is in the soil: for a nutritive solution, the fraction of caesium (radioactive and stable) absorbed by barley remains practically constant in the presence of increasing amounts (relatively small) of stable caesium; in soil, the fraction of the radio-active caesium absorbed increases as the stable caesium content (fairly low) of the soil increases, in relationship with a rapidly decreasing selectivity of the soil for Cs{sup +}. The difference between these results is thus explained by the very pronounced selectivity of the illitic soil studied for Cs{sup +}, as long as the proportion of Cs remains low, about as low as that of most natural soils. Furthermore, the K{sup +} ion is in competition with the Cs{sup +} ion, for absorption by barley in a culture medium in a nutritive solution or in soil, only when the potassium concentrations are relatively low, of the order of the nutritive maximum. This shows that the addition of potassium to a medium already rich in this element does not reduce the absorption of caesium by barley. The choice of experimental conditions close to natural conditions (nutritive media strong in calcium) and the examination of the distribution of radioactive caesium between the soil, the soil solution and the plant in the presence of very low doses of stable caesium make these results interesting from the 'atomic health' point of view; it should be expected that a definite contamination risk exists for plants cultivated on synthetic media and for plants such as rice and cress growing on flooded soils. Radio-active caesium however incorporated without carrier into a soil of medium-exchange capacity (of about 150 milli-equivalents per kilo) presents relatively little danger because of the close interdependence of the radioactive caesium take-up from the soil by the plants and its retention by the soil. Our research has made it possible furthermore to examine the value of various partial decontamination methods for soils proposed by certain atomic scientists: just as isotopic dilution appears totally inadequate for this purpose, so does it seems that the addition of potassium salts in amounts greater than nutritive optimum is incapable of reducing the absorption of radioactive caesium by the plant. (author) [French] Nous avons recherche, dans divers milieux de culture, comment l'absorption du cesium par l'orge varie avec sa concentration et comment cette absorption peut etre concurrencee par un cation alcalin voisin,le potassium. En outre, nous avons considere la distribution du cesium dans le sol - notamment du cesium radioactif - entre terre et solution, en fonction du taux de cesium. De notre etude ressort une nette opposition entre le comportement de l'orge vis a vis du cesium d'une solution nutritive et vis a vis du cesium d'un sol: sur solution nutritive, la fraction du cesium (radioactif et stable) absorbee par l'orge demeure pratiquement constante en presence de proportions croissantes (relativement petites) de cesium stable; sur sol, la fraction du cesium radioactif absorbee par l'orge a augmente en meme temps que le taux (relativement petit) de cesium stable du sol, en relation avec une selectivite rapidement decroissante du sol pour Cs. La difference entre ces resultats est donc expliquee par une tres forte selectivite du sol illitique experimente pour Cs{sup +} tant que la proportion da cesium reste tres petite, de l'ordre de celle de la plupart des sols naturels. Par ailleurs, l'ion K{sup +} n'a concurrence l'absorption de Cs{sup +} par l'orge en milieux de culture sur solution nutritive et sur sol, que jusqu'a des doses relativement faibles de potassium, de l'ordre de l'optimum nutritif. Ceci montre que l'addition de potassium a un milieu deja riche en cet element ne reduit plus l'absorption de cesium par l'orge. Le choix de conditions experimentales proches des conditions naturelles (milieux nutritifs a dominante de calcium) et l'examen de la distribution du cesium radioactif entre sol, solution du sol et plante en presence de tres petites doses de cesium stable, conferent a ces resultats un interet 'hygiene atomique': on doit s'attendre a un risque de contamination certain pour les vegetaux cultives sur milieux synthetiques et pour les vegetaux croissant sur des sols inondes tels que le riz et le cresson. Mais le cesium radioactif incorpore sans entraineur a un sol de capacite d'echange moyenne (de l'ordre de 150 milliequivalents par kg) presente relativement peu de danger, du fait de la dependance etroite entre le prelevement de Cs radioactif du sol par les plantes et sa retention dans le sol. Nos experiences nous ont permis en outre d'examiner la valeur des moyens de decontamination partielle d'un sol proposes par certains atomistes: de meme que la dilution isotopique se revele totalement inefficace sous cet angle, l'apport de sels de potasse en quantite depassant l'optimum nutritif se revele incapable de reduire l'absorption de cesium radioactif par la plante.}
place = {France}
year = {1964}
month = {Jun}
}