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Augmentative biological control in the Mexican national fruit fly campaign

Conference:

Abstract

Full text: Tephritid fruit flies are some of the most economically important species of insects worldwide. In Mexico, the native Anastrepha ludens, A. obliqua, A. serpentina and A. striata, are among the most important problems because of the great number of commercial fruits they attack. In an attempt to solve the Anastrepha fruit flies problems, the Mexican Government created the National Campaign against Fruit Flies in 1992. Using an area-wide approach and an integrated pest management framework, that included the use of environment-friendly strategies to suppress/eradicate fruit flies, the Mexican Campaign has integrated different technologies such as the application of specific toxic bait, the use of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), and the release of the endoparasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), which attacks preferably third instar larvae of fruit flies. Since 1995, the Moscafrut mass-rearing facility has the capacity to produce an average of 50 millions of parasitised pupae per week, with 65-70% of parasitoid emergence using irradiated A. ludens larvae as host. The mass-rearing procedures of D. longicaudata have been fully described by Cancino. Parasitised pupae are sent via commercial flights to several states of the country (i.e. Michoacan, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Tamaulipas), according to a yearly national plan.  More>>
Authors:
Montoya, P; [1]  Cancino, J; Gutierrez, J M; Santiago, G [1] 
  1. Campana Nacional Moscas de la Fruta, DGSV-SAGARPA (Mexico)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2005
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-CN-131; IAEA-CN-131/23P
Resource Relation:
Conference: FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests: Integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques, Vienna (Austria), 9-13 May 2005; Other Information: 3 refs; PBD: 2005; Related Information: In: FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests: Integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques. Book of extended synopses, 386 pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANASTREPHA; FRUITS; LARVAE; MASS REARING; PEST CONTROL; POPULATION DENSITY; POPULATION DYNAMICS; STERILE INSECT RELEASE; STERILE MALE TECHNIQUE; WASPS
OSTI ID:
20626259
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome (Italy)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0501406069390
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 131-132
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Montoya, P, Cancino, J, Gutierrez, J M, and Santiago, G. Augmentative biological control in the Mexican national fruit fly campaign. IAEA: N. p., 2005. Web.
Montoya, P, Cancino, J, Gutierrez, J M, & Santiago, G. Augmentative biological control in the Mexican national fruit fly campaign. IAEA.
Montoya, P, Cancino, J, Gutierrez, J M, and Santiago, G. 2005. "Augmentative biological control in the Mexican national fruit fly campaign." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20626259,
title = {Augmentative biological control in the Mexican national fruit fly campaign}
author = {Montoya, P, Cancino, J, Gutierrez, J M, and Santiago, G}
abstractNote = {Full text: Tephritid fruit flies are some of the most economically important species of insects worldwide. In Mexico, the native Anastrepha ludens, A. obliqua, A. serpentina and A. striata, are among the most important problems because of the great number of commercial fruits they attack. In an attempt to solve the Anastrepha fruit flies problems, the Mexican Government created the National Campaign against Fruit Flies in 1992. Using an area-wide approach and an integrated pest management framework, that included the use of environment-friendly strategies to suppress/eradicate fruit flies, the Mexican Campaign has integrated different technologies such as the application of specific toxic bait, the use of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), and the release of the endoparasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), which attacks preferably third instar larvae of fruit flies. Since 1995, the Moscafrut mass-rearing facility has the capacity to produce an average of 50 millions of parasitised pupae per week, with 65-70% of parasitoid emergence using irradiated A. ludens larvae as host. The mass-rearing procedures of D. longicaudata have been fully described by Cancino. Parasitised pupae are sent via commercial flights to several states of the country (i.e. Michoacan, Sinaloa, Nayarit, Tamaulipas), according to a yearly national plan. This plan derives from industry requirements and/or availability of biological material. In the target zones, parasitoids are released in specific periods and specific areas where the environmental, biological and social conditions are considered as adequate. Packing and release procedures of parasitoids follow those that Montoya et al used. The releases are focused on Anastrepha spp. host trees located in marginal areas (i.e backyard orchards), with the objective to prevent the migration of fruit fly populations into commercial orchards. The impact of parasitoids on fruit fly populations is evaluated through the trapping system (i.e. Fly/Trap/Day indices) and percent parasitism from fruit sampling. Release densities fluctuated between 1,500-2,500 parasitoids/ha, depending on the ecological complexity of the zone. Apparently, the effect of released parasitoids has been similar in all zones under control. For example, in the State of Michoacan, releases were made over 1,600 ha, and FTD reduction was nearly 39%. In Sinaloa the release density was around 2,000 wasp/ha over 10,800 ha, and the FTD reduction observed was 41%. During 2003, in the State of Nayarit the percent parasitism oscillated between 33.5 and 64.7 %, and the FTD reduction obtained was around 46%. In the State of Chiapas, under an integrated pest management scheme, the release of parasitoids contributed to reduce 68.6% the FTD index. In 2002, we observed a parasitism of more than 30% of the four economically important Anastrepha species, with the maximum rates of parasitism of 72.1%; 77.5%; 38.1% and 54.5% over A. serpentina, A. ludens, A. obliqua and A. striata, respectively. These data show the impact that augmentative releases of parasitoids can have on backyard fruit fly populations. By carrying out these actions, the presence of fruit flies inside commercial orchards could be greatly reduced, and consequently, their control will become easier. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2005}
month = {Jul}
}