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Public information and acceptance of nuclear engineering studies at the faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering of CTU Prague

Abstract

The Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering was founded in 1955, when the nuclear program in Czechoslovakia has been launched. In approximately the same time also some nuclear research institutes were founded, as, e.g., the Institute of Nuclear Research and the Research Institute of Nuclear Instruments, etc., extensive plans of development of nuclear power production were drafted, and everybody was very enthusiastic for this new branch of science and technology. The present status of nuclear technology and the new trends in applied hard sciences have resulted in widening the profile of the Faculty, because the staff has intended to preserve it as a modern and advanced part of the University. It means that now nuclear sciences represent about one third of the programme and the structure of its responsibilities. What is the public acceptance of the Faculty nowadays? Two unfavourable trends act against the interest to enrol at the Faculty. The first one is general - a decreasing interest of the young in engineering, given probably by both higher work-load in comparison with, e.g., social sciences, and a not very high social status of engineering graduates in the former socialist society. The second trend is given by a strong  More>>
Authors:
Musilek, Ladislav; Matejka, Karel [1] 
  1. Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1993
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-XA-C-010
Resource Relation:
Conference: ENS PIME '93: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice, Karlovy Vary (Czech Republic), 31 Jan - 3 Feb 1993; Other Information: 1 tab; PBD: 1993; Related Information: In: ENS PIME '93: International workshop on nuclear public information in practice. Transactions, 276 pages.
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CZECH REPUBLIC; EDUCATION; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; EDUCATIONAL TOOLS; NUCLEAR ENGINEERING; PUBLIC INFORMATION; PUBLIC OPINION; REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; TRAINING; VR-1 REACTOR
OSTI ID:
20563922
Research Organizations:
European Nuclear Society, Brussels (Belgium)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04C0393018060
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 0142-0149
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Musilek, Ladislav, and Matejka, Karel. Public information and acceptance of nuclear engineering studies at the faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering of CTU Prague. IAEA: N. p., 1993. Web.
Musilek, Ladislav, & Matejka, Karel. Public information and acceptance of nuclear engineering studies at the faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering of CTU Prague. IAEA.
Musilek, Ladislav, and Matejka, Karel. 1993. "Public information and acceptance of nuclear engineering studies at the faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering of CTU Prague." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20563922,
title = {Public information and acceptance of nuclear engineering studies at the faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering of CTU Prague}
author = {Musilek, Ladislav, and Matejka, Karel}
abstractNote = {The Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering was founded in 1955, when the nuclear program in Czechoslovakia has been launched. In approximately the same time also some nuclear research institutes were founded, as, e.g., the Institute of Nuclear Research and the Research Institute of Nuclear Instruments, etc., extensive plans of development of nuclear power production were drafted, and everybody was very enthusiastic for this new branch of science and technology. The present status of nuclear technology and the new trends in applied hard sciences have resulted in widening the profile of the Faculty, because the staff has intended to preserve it as a modern and advanced part of the University. It means that now nuclear sciences represent about one third of the programme and the structure of its responsibilities. What is the public acceptance of the Faculty nowadays? Two unfavourable trends act against the interest to enrol at the Faculty. The first one is general - a decreasing interest of the young in engineering, given probably by both higher work-load in comparison with, e.g., social sciences, and a not very high social status of engineering graduates in the former socialist society. The second trend is given by a strong antinuclear opposition and campaigns in the past few years, relatively latent between the Chernobyl accident and 1989, because the former regime had not allow any discussions about this subject, and clearly apparent after the 1989 November revolution. These antinuclear tendencies were also fuelled by the effective Greenpeace campaign in 1990, imported mostly from Austria, and, unfortunately, unfounded from the scientific point of view. How can the Faculty resist this ebb of interest? First of all this can be achieved by suitable modification of curricula towards 'computerisation' and {sup e}cologisation{sup .} Among other activities priority is given to cooperation with mass media as the press, TV etc. Direct contacts with high and grammar schools are another activity helping to keep up the interest of the young in the Faculty. 'Open House' for high and grammar schools is organized twice every year. Also, wide use of VR-1 reactor by other faculties of the Czech Technical University and other Czech and Slovak universities contributes to the good image of the Faculty in the public. This paper reviews how to recruit applicants to the Faculty: Although the appeal of nuclear branches is at its lowest point now, a faculty having the word 'nuclear' in its name may still be quite appealing to a sufficient number of young people and it can live without dangerous decrease in the number of enrolled students and graduates. We cannot be sure which of the activities listed are efficient and which are dispensable, but, generally speaking, the image of the Faculty is quite stable and not unfavourable. And, moreover, there have been no placement problems for graduates, which is the most convincing argument supporting our decision not to give up our work in the nuclear field.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1993}
month = {Jul}
}