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Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors

Journal Article:

Abstract

Experimental findings of many kinds as well as the Rossi-Kellerer theory of dual radiation action suggest that neutrons and gamma rays may differ in their biological effects, especially carcinogenesis, upon man. In particular, for many but not necessarily all cancers the carcinogenic effect of neutrons may be linear, and that of gamma- or X-radiation, a more complex function with linear and quadratic terms; in addition, dose-response functions for both types of radiation probably require a modifying factor to account for the frequently observed turn-down of dose-response curves in the high-dose region. In a further analysis of leukemia among A-Bomb survivors, Ishimaru et al. have fitted the function y a{sub 0} + a{sub 1}n + a{sub 2}{gamma}{sup 2} where the a's are constants and n and {gamma} the respective neutron and gamma doses. They find not only that this function fits the data well, although not significantly better than a straight line, but also that the best estimate of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for neutrons is 44n{sup -1/2}. In the present paper we report our efforts to re-analyze ABCC-RERF data on a variety of late radiation effects in an effort to distinguish between neutron and gamma radiation more sharply than has  More>>
Authors:
Beebe, Gilbert W; [1]  Land, Charles E; [2]  Jablon, Seymour [3] 
  1. Clinical Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)
  2. Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)
  3. Medical Follow-Up Agency, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1978
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Physics; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 6; Conference: 23. annual meeting of the Health Physics Society, Minneapolis, MN (United States), 18-23 Jun 1978; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Abstract only; PBD: Dec 1978
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; CARCINOGENESIS; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; GAMMA RADIATION; HEAD; LEUKEMIA; LEUKEMOGENESIS; LUNGS; LYMPHOMAS; MAMMARY GLANDS; MEN; NEUTRONS; RADIATION DOSES; RBE; STOMACH; THYROID
OSTI ID:
20561755
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078; HLTPAO; TRN: XA04N2285015883
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 883
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Beebe, Gilbert W, Land, Charles E, and Jablon, Seymour. Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors. IAEA: N. p., 1978. Web.
Beebe, Gilbert W, Land, Charles E, & Jablon, Seymour. Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors. IAEA.
Beebe, Gilbert W, Land, Charles E, and Jablon, Seymour. 1978. "Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20561755,
title = {Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors}
author = {Beebe, Gilbert W, Land, Charles E, and Jablon, Seymour}
abstractNote = {Experimental findings of many kinds as well as the Rossi-Kellerer theory of dual radiation action suggest that neutrons and gamma rays may differ in their biological effects, especially carcinogenesis, upon man. In particular, for many but not necessarily all cancers the carcinogenic effect of neutrons may be linear, and that of gamma- or X-radiation, a more complex function with linear and quadratic terms; in addition, dose-response functions for both types of radiation probably require a modifying factor to account for the frequently observed turn-down of dose-response curves in the high-dose region. In a further analysis of leukemia among A-Bomb survivors, Ishimaru et al. have fitted the function y a{sub 0} + a{sub 1}n + a{sub 2}{gamma}{sup 2} where the a's are constants and n and {gamma} the respective neutron and gamma doses. They find not only that this function fits the data well, although not significantly better than a straight line, but also that the best estimate of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for neutrons is 44n{sup -1/2}. In the present paper we report our efforts to re-analyze ABCC-RERF data on a variety of late radiation effects in an effort to distinguish between neutron and gamma radiation more sharply than has been possible in the past. The effects examined include: chromosomal aberrations, small heads and mental retardation, leukemia, thyroid cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, lymphomas. The results of fitting various models will be reported. Goodness of fit will be examined and efforts will be made to derive RBE estimates. (author)}
journal = {Health Physics}
issue = {6}
volume = {35}
journal type = {AC}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1978}
month = {Dec}
}