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An evaluation of water production from the Gasbuggy reentry well

Abstract

During the gas production testing of the Gasbuggy chimney, water production rates increased from an initial 4 to 5 barrels per 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet of gas to 40 to 50 barrels per 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet of gas. This unexpected occurrence hampered operations and increased waste disposal costs. A model is developed which calculates the amount of water produced from condensation of water vapor through the cooling and expansion of the gas in the production tubing. Results from this model are compared with the observed water production from November of 1968 through May of 1969. This comparison shows that up to seven times more water is being produced at high gas flow rates than can be explained by condensed vapor, indicating that water is being introduced into the production tubing in particulate or liquid form. A correlation of excess water with the pressure, temperature and gas flow velocity parameters is performed to determine the relationship between this excess water and these parameters. It is found that the excess produced water varied linearly with downhole pressure when a threshold gas flow velocity was exceeded. The relationship is expressed by the equation H{sub 2}0 (in barrels per day) =126.5-0.1473  More>>
Authors:
Power, Dean V; Bowman, Charles R [1] 
  1. El Paso Natural Gas Company (United States)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.1); INIS-XA-N-228
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 8 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs; PBD: May 1970; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Vol. 1, 871 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CHIMNEYS; GASBUGGY EVENT; NATURAL GAS WELLS; PRODUCTIVITY; UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS; WATER
OSTI ID:
20555842
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0862010816
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 732-751
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Power, Dean V, and Bowman, Charles R. An evaluation of water production from the Gasbuggy reentry well. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Power, Dean V, & Bowman, Charles R. An evaluation of water production from the Gasbuggy reentry well. IAEA.
Power, Dean V, and Bowman, Charles R. 1970. "An evaluation of water production from the Gasbuggy reentry well." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20555842,
title = {An evaluation of water production from the Gasbuggy reentry well}
author = {Power, Dean V, and Bowman, Charles R}
abstractNote = {During the gas production testing of the Gasbuggy chimney, water production rates increased from an initial 4 to 5 barrels per 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet of gas to 40 to 50 barrels per 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet of gas. This unexpected occurrence hampered operations and increased waste disposal costs. A model is developed which calculates the amount of water produced from condensation of water vapor through the cooling and expansion of the gas in the production tubing. Results from this model are compared with the observed water production from November of 1968 through May of 1969. This comparison shows that up to seven times more water is being produced at high gas flow rates than can be explained by condensed vapor, indicating that water is being introduced into the production tubing in particulate or liquid form. A correlation of excess water with the pressure, temperature and gas flow velocity parameters is performed to determine the relationship between this excess water and these parameters. It is found that the excess produced water varied linearly with downhole pressure when a threshold gas flow velocity was exceeded. The relationship is expressed by the equation H{sub 2}0 (in barrels per day) =126.5-0.1473 BHP (in pounds per square inch). The threshold gas velocity for excess water production was found to be about 6 feet per second in the 7 in casing or 40 feet per second in the 2 7/8 in tubing. An examination of the radioactivity of the gas and water produced from GB-E indicates that the tritiated water vapor in the chimney and tubing has been diluted by extraneous water. The tritium in the gas decreased as expected from about 10.9 {mu}Ci/SCF in November 1968 to 6.2 {mu}Ci/SCF in late February 1969. During this same period, the tritium in the water decreased from about 1.2 {mu}Ci/ml to 0.12 {mu}Ci/ml. Examination of water chemistry, preshot and during the production testing, indicates that at early times when there was no excess water, the produced water was distilled. At times of high water production, the trace chemical constituents are characteristic of undistilled water from the Ojo Alamo Formation (SO{sub 4} concentrations of about 3000-5000 ppm). It is concluded that a decrease in the bottom hole pressure of GB-E resulted in Ojo Alamo water entering GB-E and either being produced or flowing down GB-E into the chimney. The water entry rate follows Darcy's Law in that it is proportional to the pressure gradient between the hydrostatic head and the chimney pressure It is postulated that the water is flowing directly from the Ojo Alamo into GB-E and then flowing downward through the stemming material until it enters the inner casing through a break at 3796 feet, just 5 feet below the bottom of the production tubing. A calculation of the water volume which could enter the chimney in this manner is less than could be detected by chimney volume measurement techniques presently available. Hydrologic data shows that the hydrostatic level fluctuation of the Ojo Alamo correlates with chimney pressure and a sink is indicated at or near GB-ER. Preliminary analyses from data obtained during the test period of October and November 1969 indicate that the leak in GB-ER has been sealed, water production during this period corresponds to the calculated vapor model, water levels have risen to near normal in the Ojo Alamo and tritium levels in produced water have increased to 0.5 {mu}Ci/ml. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}