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Economics of nuclear gas stimulation

Abstract

Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs,  More>>
Authors:
Frank, G W; [1]  Coffer, H F; Luetkehans, G R [2] 
  1. Austral Oil Company Incorporated, Houston, TX (United States)
  2. CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.1); INIS-XA-N-228
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 14 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs; PBD: May 1970; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Vol. 1, 871 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CONTAMINATION; COST ESTIMATION; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; OIL SHALE DEPOSITS; PICEANCE CREEK BASIN
OSTI ID:
20555835
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0855010809
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 577-596
Announcement Date:
Feb 20, 2005

Citation Formats

Frank, G W, Coffer, H F, and Luetkehans, G R. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Frank, G W, Coffer, H F, & Luetkehans, G R. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation. IAEA.
Frank, G W, Coffer, H F, and Luetkehans, G R. 1970. "Economics of nuclear gas stimulation." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20555835,
title = {Economics of nuclear gas stimulation}
author = {Frank, G W, Coffer, H F, and Luetkehans, G R}
abstractNote = {Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs, preliminary tests, and well costs. At such prices, nothing can possibly be commercial; however, these costs can come down in a logical step-wise fashion. Radiation contamination of the gas remains a problem. Three possible solutions to this problem are included. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}