You need JavaScript to view this

Computation of fluid flow in distending tunnels with mass, momentum and energy exchange with the walls

Abstract

When calculating the effects of an underground explosion it may be useful to be able to calculate the flow of the very hot gaseous products along pipes or tunnels. For example it might be possible to treat a fault in the surrounding rock as an idealised pipe forced open by the high pressure generated by the explosion. Another possibility might be the use of a specially constructed tunnel to channel the energy released in some preferred direction. In such cases the gas flow is complicated by several phenomena. The cross section of the pipe may vary with axial distance and also distend with time. Heat will be lost to the walls of the pipe which may be ablated leading to entrainment of wall material into the gas flow. In addition wall friction will tend to retard the flow. This paper describes a simple computer program, HAT, which was written to calculate such flows. The flow is assumed to be quasi-one-dimensional in that flow quantities such as pressure density and axial velocity do not vary across the pipe. However the radius of the pipe may vary both with axial distance and with time. Sources, or sinks of mass, momentum and energy  More>>
Authors:
Maw, J R [1] 
  1. AWRE, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.1); INIS-XA-N-228
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 3 refs, 4 figs; PBD: May 1970; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Vol. 1, 871 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CALCULATION METHODS; GAS FLOW; H CODES; LAX THEOREM; ONE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; PIPES; SHOCK WAVES; TUNNELS; UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS
OSTI ID:
20555814
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0750010788
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 230-239
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Maw, J R. Computation of fluid flow in distending tunnels with mass, momentum and energy exchange with the walls. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Maw, J R. Computation of fluid flow in distending tunnels with mass, momentum and energy exchange with the walls. IAEA.
Maw, J R. 1970. "Computation of fluid flow in distending tunnels with mass, momentum and energy exchange with the walls." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20555814,
title = {Computation of fluid flow in distending tunnels with mass, momentum and energy exchange with the walls}
author = {Maw, J R}
abstractNote = {When calculating the effects of an underground explosion it may be useful to be able to calculate the flow of the very hot gaseous products along pipes or tunnels. For example it might be possible to treat a fault in the surrounding rock as an idealised pipe forced open by the high pressure generated by the explosion. Another possibility might be the use of a specially constructed tunnel to channel the energy released in some preferred direction. In such cases the gas flow is complicated by several phenomena. The cross section of the pipe may vary with axial distance and also distend with time. Heat will be lost to the walls of the pipe which may be ablated leading to entrainment of wall material into the gas flow. In addition wall friction will tend to retard the flow. This paper describes a simple computer program, HAT, which was written to calculate such flows. The flow is assumed to be quasi-one-dimensional in that flow quantities such as pressure density and axial velocity do not vary across the pipe. However the radius of the pipe may vary both with axial distance and with time. Sources, or sinks of mass, momentum and energy are included in the governing equations which allow simulation of the phenomena described above. The governing equations are derived in Eulerian form and approximated using an extension of the finite difference scheme of Lax. A brief outline of the computational procedure is given. To demonstrate the capabilities and assess the accuracy of the program two simple problems are calculated using HAT (i) The motion of a shock along a converging pipe. (ii) The effect of mass addition through the walls on the motion of a shock along a uniform pipe. In both cases results obtained using HAT are compared with theoretical analyses of the motion.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}