You need JavaScript to view this

Loading-unloading pressure-volume curves for rocks

Abstract

The stress-strain codes (SOC and TENSOR) used to calculate phenomenology of nuclear explosion for the Plowshare Program require inter alia the pressure-volume relationships of the earth media. In this paper we describe a rapid and accurate method to obtain pressure-volume data to 40 kb at 25 deg. C for rocks. These experimental results may also be related to the in situ elastic properties of the rock and to other laboratory measurement of properties, such as ultrasonic experiments with pressure and Hugoniot determinations. Qualitative features of the pressure-volume curves can be related to the initial porosity of the rock. A porous rock is usually quite compressible at low pressures. If the porosity is in the form of narrow cracks, the cracks are closed at a pressure of about 3 to 6 kb, after which the rock is much less compressible. If the porosity is in the form of spherical pores, it is not necessarily removed even at pressures of 40 kb, depending on the strength of the rock, and the compressibility is higher at all pressures than for a similar rock containing no porosity. Data for water-saturated samples show the phase transformation due to free water at about 10 and 22  More>>
Authors:
Stephens, D R; Lilley, E M [1] 
  1. Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.1); INIS-XA-N-228
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 26 refs, 8 figs, 13 tabs; PBD: May 1970; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Vol. 1, 871 pages.
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; CLAYS; COMPUTER CODES; CRACKS; ELASTICITY; GEOLOGIC FISSURES; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; POROSITY; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; ROCKS; STRAINS; STRESS ANALYSIS; VOLUME; ZEOLITES
OSTI ID:
20555809
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0745010783
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 89-109
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Stephens, D R, and Lilley, E M. Loading-unloading pressure-volume curves for rocks. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Stephens, D R, & Lilley, E M. Loading-unloading pressure-volume curves for rocks. IAEA.
Stephens, D R, and Lilley, E M. 1970. "Loading-unloading pressure-volume curves for rocks." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20555809,
title = {Loading-unloading pressure-volume curves for rocks}
author = {Stephens, D R, and Lilley, E M}
abstractNote = {The stress-strain codes (SOC and TENSOR) used to calculate phenomenology of nuclear explosion for the Plowshare Program require inter alia the pressure-volume relationships of the earth media. In this paper we describe a rapid and accurate method to obtain pressure-volume data to 40 kb at 25 deg. C for rocks. These experimental results may also be related to the in situ elastic properties of the rock and to other laboratory measurement of properties, such as ultrasonic experiments with pressure and Hugoniot determinations. Qualitative features of the pressure-volume curves can be related to the initial porosity of the rock. A porous rock is usually quite compressible at low pressures. If the porosity is in the form of narrow cracks, the cracks are closed at a pressure of about 3 to 6 kb, after which the rock is much less compressible. If the porosity is in the form of spherical pores, it is not necessarily removed even at pressures of 40 kb, depending on the strength of the rock, and the compressibility is higher at all pressures than for a similar rock containing no porosity. Data for water-saturated samples show the phase transformation due to free water at about 10 and 22 kb. However, the presence of 'nonliquid' water, which is loosely contained within the lattice of clay or zeolitic minerals or adsorbed on particle surfaces, is also observed. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}