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The future of Plowshare

Abstract

Since the last general symposium on Plowshare in 1964, significant progress has been made 1) in improving our understanding of explosion phenomenology, 2) in developing suitable explosive designs, and 3) in applying the technology to specific applications in the industrial, public works and scientific areas. The papers to be presented at this symposium will discuss in depth the progress that has been made in each of these areas, and to some degree, what still remains to be accomplished, so I will not attempt to go into detail here. However, I would like to take a few minutes to summarize where the technology stands today, where we believe it is going, and most importantly, how we hope to get there. In the excavation area, both Cabriolet and Schooner extended cratering experience in hard rock to higher yields. We also conducted Project Buggy, the first nuclear row-charge experiment. Buggy involved the simultaneous detonation of five 1.1 kiloton nuclear explosives, spaced 150 feet apart at a depth of 135 feet. The explosion created a smooth channel about 865 feet long, 254 feet wide and 70 feet deep. Two very significant contributions from Buggy were information on spacing between the explosives and on lip  More>>
Authors:
Kelly, John S [1] 
  1. Division of Peaceful Nuclear Explosives, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-700101(vol.1); INIS-XA-N-228
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 14-16 Jan 1970; Other Information: 1 tab; PBD: May 1970; Related Information: In: Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives. Proceedings. Vol. 1, 871 pages.
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DESIGN; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVES; PLOWSHARE PROJECT; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TESTING; UNDERGROUND EXPLOSIONS
OSTI ID:
20555802
Research Organizations:
American Nuclear Society, Hinsdale, IL (United States); United States Atomic Energy Commission (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0738010776
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 5-12
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Kelly, John S. The future of Plowshare. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Kelly, John S. The future of Plowshare. IAEA.
Kelly, John S. 1970. "The future of Plowshare." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20555802,
title = {The future of Plowshare}
author = {Kelly, John S}
abstractNote = {Since the last general symposium on Plowshare in 1964, significant progress has been made 1) in improving our understanding of explosion phenomenology, 2) in developing suitable explosive designs, and 3) in applying the technology to specific applications in the industrial, public works and scientific areas. The papers to be presented at this symposium will discuss in depth the progress that has been made in each of these areas, and to some degree, what still remains to be accomplished, so I will not attempt to go into detail here. However, I would like to take a few minutes to summarize where the technology stands today, where we believe it is going, and most importantly, how we hope to get there. In the excavation area, both Cabriolet and Schooner extended cratering experience in hard rock to higher yields. We also conducted Project Buggy, the first nuclear row-charge experiment. Buggy involved the simultaneous detonation of five 1.1 kiloton nuclear explosives, spaced 150 feet apart at a depth of 135 feet. The explosion created a smooth channel about 865 feet long, 254 feet wide and 70 feet deep. Two very significant contributions from Buggy were information on spacing between the explosives and on lip height. Buggy demonstrated that explosives can probably be spaced somewhat farther apart than previously thought without significantly affecting the smoothness of the channel. This could result in considerable savings in future row-charge excavations. We were also particularly pleased that, as predicted, the height of the lips at the end of the ditch was less than half the height of the lips on the sides - some 14 feet versus 41 feet. This is extremely important for the connecting of ditches. The data obtained from Buggy, Schooner and other experiments have been used to extend and refine our predictive capability.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {May}
}