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Comparison of three methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke

Abstract

We compared smoke composition and biological effects resulting from exposures of rats for 5 wk to cigarette smoke by nose-only intermittent (NOI), nose-only continuous (NOC) and whole-body continuous (WBC) exposure methods. Exposure concentrations and times were adjusted to achieve the same daily concentration x time product for particulate matter. There were few differences in smoke composition or biological effects among exposure modes. WBC smoke was lower in particle-borne nicotine and higher in some organic vapors and carbon monoxide than smoke in nose-only modes. Body weight was depressed less by WBC than by NOI or NOC exposures. Plasma and urine nicotine levels were higher for WBC than for NOI or NOC, suggesting greater absorption from body surfaces or by grooming. Smoke exposures increased nasal epithelial proliferation, tracheal epithelial cell transformation, chromosomal aberrations in alveolar macrophages, and lung DNA adduct levels, and caused inflammatory changes in airway fluid and slight alterations of respiratory function, but there were no significant differences among exposure modes. The results indicate that WBC exposures should produce long-term effects similar to those of nose-only exposures, but might allow increased delivery of smoke to lungs while reducing stress, acute toxicity and the manpower requirements associated with performing these experiments.  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1988
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
LMF-121; INIS-XA-N-170
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 9 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs; PBD: Dec 1988; Related Information: In: Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988, by Mauderly, J.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A. (eds.), 659 pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CARBON MONOXIDE; CELL TRANSFORMATIONS; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; DNA; LUNGS; MACROPHAGES; NICOTINE; NOSE; RATS; TOBACCO SMOKES; TOXICITY; URINE; VAPORS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Office of Health and Environmental Research, U.S. Department of Energy (United States)
OSTI ID:
20547812
Research Organizations:
Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract DE-AC04-76EV01013; TRN: XA04N1378003642
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 324-332
Announcement Date:
Feb 01, 2005

Citation Formats

Mauderly, J L, Bechtold, W E, Bond, J A, Brooks, A L, Chen, B T, Cuddihy, R G, Harkema, J R, Henderson, R F, Johnson, N F, Ritchideh, K, and Thomassen, D G. Comparison of three methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. IAEA: N. p., 1988. Web.
Mauderly, J L, Bechtold, W E, Bond, J A, Brooks, A L, Chen, B T, Cuddihy, R G, Harkema, J R, Henderson, R F, Johnson, N F, Ritchideh, K, & Thomassen, D G. Comparison of three methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke. IAEA.
Mauderly, J L, Bechtold, W E, Bond, J A, Brooks, A L, Chen, B T, Cuddihy, R G, Harkema, J R, Henderson, R F, Johnson, N F, Ritchideh, K, and Thomassen, D G. 1988. "Comparison of three methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20547812,
title = {Comparison of three methods of exposing rats to cigarette smoke}
author = {Mauderly, J L, Bechtold, W E, Bond, J A, Brooks, A L, Chen, B T, Cuddihy, R G, Harkema, J R, Henderson, R F, Johnson, N F, Ritchideh, K, and Thomassen, D G}
abstractNote = {We compared smoke composition and biological effects resulting from exposures of rats for 5 wk to cigarette smoke by nose-only intermittent (NOI), nose-only continuous (NOC) and whole-body continuous (WBC) exposure methods. Exposure concentrations and times were adjusted to achieve the same daily concentration x time product for particulate matter. There were few differences in smoke composition or biological effects among exposure modes. WBC smoke was lower in particle-borne nicotine and higher in some organic vapors and carbon monoxide than smoke in nose-only modes. Body weight was depressed less by WBC than by NOI or NOC exposures. Plasma and urine nicotine levels were higher for WBC than for NOI or NOC, suggesting greater absorption from body surfaces or by grooming. Smoke exposures increased nasal epithelial proliferation, tracheal epithelial cell transformation, chromosomal aberrations in alveolar macrophages, and lung DNA adduct levels, and caused inflammatory changes in airway fluid and slight alterations of respiratory function, but there were no significant differences among exposure modes. The results indicate that WBC exposures should produce long-term effects similar to those of nose-only exposures, but might allow increased delivery of smoke to lungs while reducing stress, acute toxicity and the manpower requirements associated with performing these experiments. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1988}
month = {Dec}
}