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Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging; Trastornos obsesivos compulsivos (TOC): avances imagenologicos

Journal Article:

Abstract

In the past twenty years functional brain imaging has advanced to the point of tackling the differential diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response in Neurology and Psychiatry. Psychiatric disorders were rendered 'functional' a century ago; however nowadays they can be seen by means of brain imaging. Functional images in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (NEUROSPET) show in non-invasive fashion the state of brain functioning. PET does this assessing glucose metabolism and NEUROSPET by putting cerebral blood flow in images. Prevalence of OCD is clearly low (2 to 3%), but comorbidity with depression, psychoses, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia is high. Furthermore, it is not infrequent with autism, attention disorder, tichotillomany, borderline personality disorders, in pathological compulsive spending, sexual compulsion and in pathological gambling, in tics, and in Gilles de la Tourette disorder, NEUROSPET and PET show hypoperfusion in both frontal lobes, in their prefrontal dorsolateral aspects, in their inferior zone and premotor cortex, with hyperperfusion in the posterior cingulum and hypoperfusion in basal ganglia (caudate nucleus). Cummings states that hyperactivity of the limbic system might be involved in OCD. Thus, brain imaging in OCD is a diagnostic aid, allows us to see clinical imagenological evolution and therapeutic response  More>>
Authors:
Galli, Enrique [1] 
  1. Departamento de Psiquiatria de la Univeversidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, San Isidro, Lima (Peru)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2000
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ALASBIMN Journal; Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 8; Other Information: 66 refs; PBD: Jul 2000
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; DIAGNOSIS; FLUORINE 18; IMAGE SCANNERS; MENTAL DISORDERS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; SCINTISCANNING; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; THERAPEUTIC USES
OSTI ID:
20521494
Country of Origin:
Chile
Language:
Spanish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0717-4055; TRN: CL04C0448089549
Availability:
Available as electronic journal from the website:http://www.alasbimnjournal.cl/revistas/8/galli.html;INIS
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
11 pages
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Galli, Enrique. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging; Trastornos obsesivos compulsivos (TOC): avances imagenologicos. Chile: N. p., 2000. Web.
Galli, Enrique. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging; Trastornos obsesivos compulsivos (TOC): avances imagenologicos. Chile.
Galli, Enrique. 2000. "Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging; Trastornos obsesivos compulsivos (TOC): avances imagenologicos." Chile.
@misc{etde_20521494,
title = {Obsessive-compulsive disorder: advances in brain imaging; Trastornos obsesivos compulsivos (TOC): avances imagenologicos}
author = {Galli, Enrique}
abstractNote = {In the past twenty years functional brain imaging has advanced to the point of tackling the differential diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response in Neurology and Psychiatry. Psychiatric disorders were rendered 'functional' a century ago; however nowadays they can be seen by means of brain imaging. Functional images in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (NEUROSPET) show in non-invasive fashion the state of brain functioning. PET does this assessing glucose metabolism and NEUROSPET by putting cerebral blood flow in images. Prevalence of OCD is clearly low (2 to 3%), but comorbidity with depression, psychoses, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia is high. Furthermore, it is not infrequent with autism, attention disorder, tichotillomany, borderline personality disorders, in pathological compulsive spending, sexual compulsion and in pathological gambling, in tics, and in Gilles de la Tourette disorder, NEUROSPET and PET show hypoperfusion in both frontal lobes, in their prefrontal dorsolateral aspects, in their inferior zone and premotor cortex, with hyperperfusion in the posterior cingulum and hypoperfusion in basal ganglia (caudate nucleus). Cummings states that hyperactivity of the limbic system might be involved in OCD. Thus, brain imaging in OCD is a diagnostic aid, allows us to see clinical imagenological evolution and therapeutic response and, possibly, it is useful predict therapeutic response (Au)}
journal = {ALASBIMN Journal}
issue = {8}
volume = {2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Chile}
year = {2000}
month = {Jul}
}