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Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes

Abstract

The effect of obesity on glucose intolerance is a mixture of impact of body composition on glucose-insulin relationships as well as the modulation of this metabolism by physical activity. In this project, we seek to measure the energy expenditure on activity, the rate of weight gain and changes in body composition in a free-living population, and to relate these variables to changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We have enrolled a cohort of 280 adults in Idikan, a poor urban community in lbadan, Nigeria, selected by simple random sampling from a population database. In this communication, we report characteristics of the study cohort, findings on evaluation of a physical activity questionnaire and changes in body size, body composition and measures of insulin resistance over a one-year period. Mean age of the men is 49.7 (SD 12.7) years and of the women 44.7 (SD 10.7) years. Mean fasting blood glucose was 4.57 (SD 4.75) mmol/L among men and 3.54 (SD 1.02) mmol/L among women. The modified HIP physical activity (PA) questionnaire was evaluated in a subset of participants for whom scale reliability coefficients of 0.57 and 0.33 were obtained for the occupational and leisure scales of HIP respectively. Two-week test-retest  More>>
Authors:
Adeyemo, A A; [1]  Omotade, O O; [2]  Forrester, T E; [3]  Luke, A; [4]  Rotimi, C; [5]  Owoaje, E T [6] 
  1. Department of Paediatrics and Institute of Child Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, University College Hospital, Ibadan (Nigeria)
  2. Institute of Child Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria)
  3. Tropical Metabolism Research Institute, University of the West Indies, Kingston (Jamaica)
  4. Department of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Loyola University, Chicago (United States)
  5. National Human Genome Center, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States)
  6. Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan (Nigeria)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2002
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
NAHRES-70
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. research co-ordination meeting on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-insulin dependent diseases) in ageing, Kingston (Jamaica), 25-29 Jun 2001; Other Information: 10 refs, 4 figs, 19 tabs; PBD: 2002; Related Information: In: Co-ordinated research project on application of nuclear techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases (obesity and non-Insulin dependent diseases) in ageing. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting, 214 pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BODY COMPOSITION; EXERCISE; GLUCOSE; INSULIN; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; MEN; WOMEN
OSTI ID:
20487950
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nutritional and Health-Related Environmental Studies, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0404151061048
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 155-197
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Adeyemo, A A, Omotade, O O, Forrester, T E, Luke, A, Rotimi, C, and Owoaje, E T. Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes. IAEA: N. p., 2002. Web.
Adeyemo, A A, Omotade, O O, Forrester, T E, Luke, A, Rotimi, C, & Owoaje, E T. Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes. IAEA.
Adeyemo, A A, Omotade, O O, Forrester, T E, Luke, A, Rotimi, C, and Owoaje, E T. 2002. "Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20487950,
title = {Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes}
author = {Adeyemo, A A, Omotade, O O, Forrester, T E, Luke, A, Rotimi, C, and Owoaje, E T}
abstractNote = {The effect of obesity on glucose intolerance is a mixture of impact of body composition on glucose-insulin relationships as well as the modulation of this metabolism by physical activity. In this project, we seek to measure the energy expenditure on activity, the rate of weight gain and changes in body composition in a free-living population, and to relate these variables to changes in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We have enrolled a cohort of 280 adults in Idikan, a poor urban community in lbadan, Nigeria, selected by simple random sampling from a population database. In this communication, we report characteristics of the study cohort, findings on evaluation of a physical activity questionnaire and changes in body size, body composition and measures of insulin resistance over a one-year period. Mean age of the men is 49.7 (SD 12.7) years and of the women 44.7 (SD 10.7) years. Mean fasting blood glucose was 4.57 (SD 4.75) mmol/L among men and 3.54 (SD 1.02) mmol/L among women. The modified HIP physical activity (PA) questionnaire was evaluated in a subset of participants for whom scale reliability coefficients of 0.57 and 0.33 were obtained for the occupational and leisure scales of HIP respectively. Two-week test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.53. On validation against doubly-labelled water measurements, the HIP occupational score showed a positive correlation (r=0.37, p=0.01) with activity energy expenditure per kg body weight (AEE per kg) and a similar correlation of 0. 37 with physical activity level (PAL). Thus, the HIP occupational scale showed adequate consistency, good test-retest reliability and good correlations with measures of physical activity by doubly-labelled water. Over a one-year follow-up period, the participants showed increases in weight, BMI, waist circumferences, fat mass, fasting insulin and insulin-to-glucose ratio. However, HOMA-IR did not significantly change. Overweight increased from 21.3% to 23.9% while obesity increased from 5.2% to 7.7%. Baseline PA and change in PA were significant predictors of change in fat mass but not of other outcomes. None of the participants became IGT or diabetic during the year. These findings are discussed in relation to the findings in the Jamaican study. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2002}
month = {Jul}
}