You need JavaScript to view this

Energy security externalities and fuel cycle comparisons

Abstract

Externalities related to 'energy security' may be one way in which the full social costs of energy use diverge from the market prices of energy commodities. Such divergences need to be included in reckoning the full costs of different fuel cycles. In this paper we critically examine potential externalities related to energy security and issues related to the measurement of 2 these externalities, in the context of fuel cycle comparisons.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-159
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs, 6 figs; PBD: Jul 1994; Related Information: In: Estimating fuel cycle externalities: Analytical methods and issues. Report number 2 on the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles: A study by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities, 663 pages.
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COST ESTIMATION; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; ENERGY ANALYSIS; ENERGY POLICY; FUEL CYCLE; IMPORTS; MARKET; OPEC; PETROLEUM; PRICES; SAFETY
OSTI ID:
20478195
Research Organizations:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400; ISBN 1-56760-028-X; TRN: XA04N1454052308
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
34 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Bohi, D, and Toman, M. Energy security externalities and fuel cycle comparisons. IAEA: N. p., 1994. Web.
Bohi, D, & Toman, M. Energy security externalities and fuel cycle comparisons. IAEA.
Bohi, D, and Toman, M. 1994. "Energy security externalities and fuel cycle comparisons." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20478195,
title = {Energy security externalities and fuel cycle comparisons}
author = {Bohi, D, and Toman, M}
abstractNote = {Externalities related to 'energy security' may be one way in which the full social costs of energy use diverge from the market prices of energy commodities. Such divergences need to be included in reckoning the full costs of different fuel cycles. In this paper we critically examine potential externalities related to energy security and issues related to the measurement of 2 these externalities, in the context of fuel cycle comparisons.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1994}
month = {Jul}
}