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The benefits of visibility

Abstract

The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-159
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs, 4 tabs; PBD: Jul 1994; Related Information: In: Estimating fuel cycle externalities: Analytical methods and issues. Report number 2 on the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles: A study by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities, 663 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COST ESTIMATION; DISEASE INCIDENCE; DISEASES; HEALTH HAZARDS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RISK ASSESSMENT; VISIBILITY
OSTI ID:
20478191
Research Organizations:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400; ISBN 1-56760-028-X; TRN: XA04N1450052304
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
32 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Krupnick, A, and DeWitt, D. The benefits of visibility. IAEA: N. p., 1994. Web.
Krupnick, A, & DeWitt, D. The benefits of visibility. IAEA.
Krupnick, A, and DeWitt, D. 1994. "The benefits of visibility." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20478191,
title = {The benefits of visibility}
author = {Krupnick, A, and DeWitt, D}
abstractNote = {The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in the literature to derive willingness to pay (WTP)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1994}
month = {Jul}
}