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The benefits of reduced morbidity

Abstract

Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment.
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-N-159
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs, 5 tabs; PBD: Jul 1994; Related Information: In: Estimating fuel cycle externalities: Analytical methods and issues. Report number 2 on the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles: A study by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities, 663 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COST ESTIMATION; DISEASE INCIDENCE; DISEASES; HEALTH HAZARDS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RISK ASSESSMENT
OSTI ID:
20478190
Research Organizations:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400; ISBN 1-56760-028-X; TRN: XA04N1449052303
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
44 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Krupnick, A, Hood, C, and Harrison, K. The benefits of reduced morbidity. IAEA: N. p., 1994. Web.
Krupnick, A, Hood, C, & Harrison, K. The benefits of reduced morbidity. IAEA.
Krupnick, A, Hood, C, and Harrison, K. 1994. "The benefits of reduced morbidity." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20478190,
title = {The benefits of reduced morbidity}
author = {Krupnick, A, Hood, C, and Harrison, K}
abstractNote = {Morbidity benefits refer to increases in utility arising from reductions in incidents of acute health impairments and from increases in the probability of developing chronic diseases. The impairments would run the gamut from a cough-day to a bed-disability-day, while the chronic diseases include classic pollution-related diseases, such as cancer, to in utero effects and learning disabilities. As with mortality benefits, there could be benefits to oneself and family and friends as well as benefits based on altruism. A major difference between the mortality and morbidity valuation literatures is that while estimates of the former are always based on risk (one is never trying to obtain values for avoiding certain death), estimates of the latter generally are not. That is, most of the theory and empirical estimates are based on models where the effect to be avoided is certain. This assumption holds reasonably well for estimating common acute effects, for example, the willingness to pay (WTP) for one less cough-day. It works less well, if at all, for chronic illness endpoints, where benefits seem to be appropriately expressed in terms of reduced risk of developing a disease or impairment.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1994}
month = {Jul}
}