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Some emergency instrumentation

Technical Report:

Abstract

The widespread release of activity and the resultant spread of contamination after the Chernobyl accident resulted in requests to NRPB to provide instruments for, and expertise in, the measurement of radiation. The most common request was for advice on the usefulness of existing instruments, but Board staff were also involved in their adaptation or in the development of new instruments specially to meet the circumstances of the accident. The accident occurred on 26 April. On 1 May, NRPB was involved at Heathrow Airport in the monitoring of the British students who had returned from Kiev and Minsk. The main purpose was to reassure the students by checking that their persons and belongings did not have significant surface contamination. Additional measurements were also made of iodine activity in thyroid using hand-held detectors or a mobile body monitor. This operation was arranged with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, which had also received numerous requests for instruments from embassies and consulates in countries close to the scene of the accident. There was concern for the well-being of staff and other United Kingdom nationals who resided in or intended to visit the most affected countries. The board supplied suitable instruments, and the FCO distributed  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1986
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NRPB-M-139
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 3 refs; PBD: Oct 1986; Related Information: In: A compilation of early papers by members of NRPB staff about the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986, 164 pages.
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CESIUM 134; CESIUM 137; DOSEMETERS; FOOD; ISOTOPE RATIO; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIATION MONITORS; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; SURFACE CONTAMINATION MONITORS
OSTI ID:
20473494
Research Organizations:
National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA04N0339048756
Availability:
Available from National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (GB)
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 104-107
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Burgess, P H. Some emergency instrumentation. IAEA: N. p., 1986. Web.
Burgess, P H. Some emergency instrumentation. IAEA.
Burgess, P H. 1986. "Some emergency instrumentation." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20473494,
title = {Some emergency instrumentation}
author = {Burgess, P H}
abstractNote = {The widespread release of activity and the resultant spread of contamination after the Chernobyl accident resulted in requests to NRPB to provide instruments for, and expertise in, the measurement of radiation. The most common request was for advice on the usefulness of existing instruments, but Board staff were also involved in their adaptation or in the development of new instruments specially to meet the circumstances of the accident. The accident occurred on 26 April. On 1 May, NRPB was involved at Heathrow Airport in the monitoring of the British students who had returned from Kiev and Minsk. The main purpose was to reassure the students by checking that their persons and belongings did not have significant surface contamination. Additional measurements were also made of iodine activity in thyroid using hand-held detectors or a mobile body monitor. This operation was arranged with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, which had also received numerous requests for instruments from embassies and consulates in countries close to the scene of the accident. There was concern for the well-being of staff and other United Kingdom nationals who resided in or intended to visit the most affected countries. The board supplied suitable instruments, and the FCO distributed them to embassies. The frequency of environmental monitoring was increased from 29 April in anticipation of contamination and appropriate Board instrumentation was deployed. After the Chernobyl cloud arrived in the UK on 2 May, there were numerous requests from local government, public authorities, private companies and members of the public for information and advice on monitoring equipment and procedures. Some of these requirements could be met with existing equipment but members of the public were usually advised not to proceed. At a later stage, the contamination of foodstuffs and livestock required the development of an instrument capable of detecting low levels of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs in food, and the adaptation of existing equipment to produce a mobile monitor for sheep to support the MAFF monitoring programme.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1986}
month = {Oct}
}