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I support renewable energy but : significant planning issues for wind turbines

Abstract

This PowerPoint presentation examined the wind power project of Blue Highlands, located in Eastern Grey County, Ontario. The project, for which no approval has yet been obtained, involves 67 turbines (120-130 MW). The staff of the Niagara Escarpment Commission (NEC) has made the following recommendations concerning wind energy development projects: (1) the Niagara Escarpment Plan should not be the focus of large-scale industrial type wind power development, (2) wind power developments should be allowed only in certain portions of the Plan area, (3) permission may be granted for household or farm generators throughout the Plan, on a case-by-case basis, (4) the NEC should review proposals adjacent to Plan boundaries which may have a visual impact, and (5) conduct further reviews after major parks are constructed elsewhere. The author identified important planning issues such as environmental impacts, visual impacts, and noise. Policy implementation through zoning is dependent on defining terms and establishing requirements for setbacks, signage, accessory structures and facilities, height maximums, decommissioning provisions, and site planning. The author discussed data collection and dissemination, as well as mapping. The presentation concluded with proposals for policy development, where the author argued that everyone should play their part. Areas with high potential should  More>>
Authors:
Pausner, J [1] 
  1. County of Grey, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2004
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Canadian Wind Energy Association's 1. Ontario wind power summit, Toronto, ON (Canada), 24 Feb 2004; Other Information: This paper can be found in session 2 entitled: Zoning and planning for wind energy developments; PBD: 2004; Related Information: In: Papers of the Canadian Wind Energy Association's 1. Ontario wind power summit, [150] pages.
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND POWER; ENERGY POLICY; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; WIND TURBINE ARRAYS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LAND USE; ONTARIO
OSTI ID:
20455547
Research Organizations:
Canadian Wind Energy Association, Calgary, AB (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: CA0401088
Availability:
Available from the Canadian Wind Energy Association, 3553 - 31 Street NW Suite 100, Calgary, Alberta, T2L 2K7 or from the Internet at http://www.canwea.ca
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
page(s) 1-11
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Pausner, J. I support renewable energy but : significant planning issues for wind turbines. Canada: N. p., 2004. Web.
Pausner, J. I support renewable energy but : significant planning issues for wind turbines. Canada.
Pausner, J. 2004. "I support renewable energy but : significant planning issues for wind turbines." Canada.
@misc{etde_20455547,
title = {I support renewable energy but : significant planning issues for wind turbines}
author = {Pausner, J}
abstractNote = {This PowerPoint presentation examined the wind power project of Blue Highlands, located in Eastern Grey County, Ontario. The project, for which no approval has yet been obtained, involves 67 turbines (120-130 MW). The staff of the Niagara Escarpment Commission (NEC) has made the following recommendations concerning wind energy development projects: (1) the Niagara Escarpment Plan should not be the focus of large-scale industrial type wind power development, (2) wind power developments should be allowed only in certain portions of the Plan area, (3) permission may be granted for household or farm generators throughout the Plan, on a case-by-case basis, (4) the NEC should review proposals adjacent to Plan boundaries which may have a visual impact, and (5) conduct further reviews after major parks are constructed elsewhere. The author identified important planning issues such as environmental impacts, visual impacts, and noise. Policy implementation through zoning is dependent on defining terms and establishing requirements for setbacks, signage, accessory structures and facilities, height maximums, decommissioning provisions, and site planning. The author discussed data collection and dissemination, as well as mapping. The presentation concluded with proposals for policy development, where the author argued that everyone should play their part. Areas with high potential should be examined and development constrained in order to ensure the protection of existing incompatible uses. The public must be involved in locally based projects. Wind theft issue must be addressed. figs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {2004}
month = {Jul}
}