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Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations

Conference:

Abstract

Livestock production plays an important role in Mongolian economy. Over the last decade it has contributed to around 80-90% of the gross domestic agricultural products and to 30% of the revenues generated from exportations. Cattle is one of the five traditional and most important livestock species of Mongolia together with horse, sheep, goat and camel. Out of a total of 1.57 millions Mongolian cattle, 1.55 millions supposedly belong to three indigenous Bos taurus cattle breeds, namely Mongol, Selenge and Khalkhun Golun, all herded under extensive pastoral systems. Indigenous Mongolian cattle are generally small but look sturdy and strong. They have a well-off coat of hair, solid forward looking shoulders and short stubby snouts, and they are used for meat, milk and transport. Beef production contributes to 30% of the total meat supply in Mongolia. The Mongol breed is by the far the commonest with 1.53 million animals and it is found almost throughout the country. The Selenge breed, found in Selenge province and numbering 9000 heads, was developed in middle of the 20th century by crossing the Kazakh Whiteheaded with the local Mongol cattle. The Khalkhun Golun breed was developed from local Mongol cattle and it is distributed in Eastern  More>>
Authors:
Lkhagva, B; [1]  Ochieng, J W; Hanotte, O; Jianlin, H; [2]  Yoon, D H [3] 
  1. International Livestock Research Institute - ILRI, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi (Kenya) and Mongolian State Agricultural University, Zaisan, Ulaanbaatar 210153 (Mongolia)
  2. International Livestock Research Institute - ILRI, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi (Kenya)
  3. National Livestock Research Institute, RDA, 441-350, Suwon (Korea)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2003
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-CN-110; IAEA-CN-110/79
Resource Relation:
Conference: FAO/IAEA international symposium on applications of gene-based technologies for improving animal production and health in developing countries, Vienna (Austria), 6-10 Oct 2003; Other Information: 4 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab; PBD: 2003; Related Information: In: FAO/IAEA international symposium on applications of gene-based technologies for improving animal production and health in developing countries. Book of extended synopses, 183 pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; ANIMAL BREEDING; CATTLE; DAIRY INDUSTRY; GENETIC VARIABILITY; MEAT; MONGOLIAN PEOPLES REPUBLIC; POPULATION DYNAMICS; RFLPS
OSTI ID:
20417816
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome (Italy)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0303125002630
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 19-21
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Lkhagva, B, Ochieng, J W, Hanotte, O, Jianlin, H, and Yoon, D H. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations. IAEA: N. p., 2003. Web.
Lkhagva, B, Ochieng, J W, Hanotte, O, Jianlin, H, & Yoon, D H. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations. IAEA.
Lkhagva, B, Ochieng, J W, Hanotte, O, Jianlin, H, and Yoon, D H. 2003. "Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20417816,
title = {Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations}
author = {Lkhagva, B, Ochieng, J W, Hanotte, O, Jianlin, H, and Yoon, D H}
abstractNote = {Livestock production plays an important role in Mongolian economy. Over the last decade it has contributed to around 80-90% of the gross domestic agricultural products and to 30% of the revenues generated from exportations. Cattle is one of the five traditional and most important livestock species of Mongolia together with horse, sheep, goat and camel. Out of a total of 1.57 millions Mongolian cattle, 1.55 millions supposedly belong to three indigenous Bos taurus cattle breeds, namely Mongol, Selenge and Khalkhun Golun, all herded under extensive pastoral systems. Indigenous Mongolian cattle are generally small but look sturdy and strong. They have a well-off coat of hair, solid forward looking shoulders and short stubby snouts, and they are used for meat, milk and transport. Beef production contributes to 30% of the total meat supply in Mongolia. The Mongol breed is by the far the commonest with 1.53 million animals and it is found almost throughout the country. The Selenge breed, found in Selenge province and numbering 9000 heads, was developed in middle of the 20th century by crossing the Kazakh Whiteheaded with the local Mongol cattle. The Khalkhun Golun breed was developed from local Mongol cattle and it is distributed in Eastern and Suhbaatar provinces with about 10,000 heads. Until now, to the best of our knowledge, only a single population of Mongolian cattle has been studied with microsatellite DNA markers and no information is available on the genetic relationship between the Mongolian indigenous cattle breeds. In this study, we collected samples from two populations of the Mongol cattle (sampled at Ikhtamir soum in North Hangay province and Tsogt soum in Govi Altay province) and one population of the Khalkhun Golun cattle (sampled at Tumentsogt soum in Suhbaatar province). Samples were characterised with nine microsatellite markers MGTG4B, ILSTS005, ILSTS006, ILSTS008, ILSTS023, ILSTS028, ILSTS036, ILSTS050 and ILSTS103. To assess the genetic diversity and relationship of Mongolian cattle populations with breeds from neighboring countries and exotic breeds, data from the ILRI cattle genotyping database were included. More particularly, we used previously obtained data from Asian taurine (Hanwoo, Yanbian and Japanese Black), two European taurine (Friesian and Charolais), two African taurine (Baoule and N'Dama) and two zebu breeds (Sahiwal and Ongole). For each breed, observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosities as well as the mean number of alleles (MNA) across the nine loci were calculated between pairs of populations were also estimated and a UPGMA tree was constructed. The heterozygosities (Ho and He) in Mongolian cattle populations are similar to those obtained in Northeast Asian taurine breeds but the values are higher compared to the ones obtained for the European and African taurine breeds. The Mongol cattle in North Hangay has the highest corrected MNA value (all animals or 28 animals only). The UPGMA tree, built with the Reynolds' genetic distances, shows all six Northeast Asian cattle populations clustering into one group linked to the two European taurine breed. Interestingly, the two populations of the Mongol cattle are not closely related to each other. However, bootstrap values between the Northeast Asian taurine breeds, with the exception of the bootstrap value between Yanbian and Hanwoo, are relatively low, therefore the relationship between the Northeast Asian populations should be taken with caution. Fst values between the three Mongolian cattle populations are significant (P < 0.01), with the Govi Altay population being more differentiated from the North Hangay population than from the Khalkhun Golun breed (data not shown). Our data suggest that the traditional classification of Govi Altay and North Hangay populations as one breed, the Mongol cattle, should be revisited.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2003}
month = {Jul}
}