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Base of skull and cervical spine chordomas in children treated by high-dose irradiation

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of children with base of skull or cervical spine chordomas treated by high dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen children, 4 to 18 years of age, with base of skull or cervical spine chordomas, received fractionated high-dose postoperative radiation using mixed photon and 160 MeV proton beams. The median tumor dose was 69 Cobalt Gray-equivalent (CGE) with a 1.8 CGE daily fraction. Results: The median follow-up was 72 months. The 5-year actuarial survival was 68% and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 63%. The only significant prognostic factor was the location: patients with cervical spine chordomas had a worse survival than those with base of skull lesions (p = 0.008). The incidence of treatment-related morbidity was acceptable: two patients developed a growth hormone deficit corrected by hormone replacement, one temporal lobe necrosis, and one fibrosis of the temporalis muscle, improved by surgery. Conclusion: Chordomas in children behave similarly to those in adults: children can receive the same high-dose irradiation as adults with acceptable morbidity.
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 1995 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); PBD: 1 Feb 1995
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHILDREN; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; MEV RANGE 100-1000; NEOPLASMS; PHOTON BEAMS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIOTHERAPY; SKELETAL DISEASES; SKULL; SPINAL CORD; SURGERY; SURVIVAL TIME
OSTI ID:
20391060
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3016; IOBPD3; TRN: US03R1447057407
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 577-581
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Benk, Veronique, Liebsch, Norbert J, Munzenrider, John E, Efird, John, McManus, Patricia, and Suit, Herman. Base of skull and cervical spine chordomas in children treated by high-dose irradiation. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00395-2.
Benk, Veronique, Liebsch, Norbert J, Munzenrider, John E, Efird, John, McManus, Patricia, & Suit, Herman. Base of skull and cervical spine chordomas in children treated by high-dose irradiation. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00395-2.
Benk, Veronique, Liebsch, Norbert J, Munzenrider, John E, Efird, John, McManus, Patricia, and Suit, Herman. 1995. "Base of skull and cervical spine chordomas in children treated by high-dose irradiation." United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00395-2. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0360-3016(94)00395-2.
@misc{etde_20391060,
title = {Base of skull and cervical spine chordomas in children treated by high-dose irradiation}
author = {Benk, Veronique, Liebsch, Norbert J, Munzenrider, John E, Efird, John, McManus, Patricia, and Suit, Herman}
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of children with base of skull or cervical spine chordomas treated by high dose irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen children, 4 to 18 years of age, with base of skull or cervical spine chordomas, received fractionated high-dose postoperative radiation using mixed photon and 160 MeV proton beams. The median tumor dose was 69 Cobalt Gray-equivalent (CGE) with a 1.8 CGE daily fraction. Results: The median follow-up was 72 months. The 5-year actuarial survival was 68% and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 63%. The only significant prognostic factor was the location: patients with cervical spine chordomas had a worse survival than those with base of skull lesions (p = 0.008). The incidence of treatment-related morbidity was acceptable: two patients developed a growth hormone deficit corrected by hormone replacement, one temporal lobe necrosis, and one fibrosis of the temporalis muscle, improved by surgery. Conclusion: Chordomas in children behave similarly to those in adults: children can receive the same high-dose irradiation as adults with acceptable morbidity.}
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(94)00395-2}
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics}
issue = {3}
volume = {31}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1995}
month = {Feb}
}