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Brain tumors in children: long-term survival after radiation treatment

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the cause of death in children who survive more than 5 years after radiation treatment of a brain tumor. Methods and Material: Nine hundred and twelve consecutive children with a primary brain tumor irradiated at the Princess Margaret Hospital or Toronto-Bayview Regional Cancer Center from 1958 to 1991, were evaluated for long-term outcome. Results: Overall 10- and 20-year survival rates were 44% and 37%. Subsequent survival of 377 5-year survivors was, at an additional 10 and 20 years, 78% and 67%. Most (83%) deaths that occurred more than 5 years from diagnosis were a result of relapse of the original tumor. The 10-year survival rate subsequent to relapse was 9% when the first relapse occurred less than one year from diagnosis, 17% for 1-2 years, and 31% when the time to relapse was 3 years or greater. The cumulative actuarial incidence of, and death from, second malignant tumors at 30 years from diagnosis was 18% and 13%, respectively. Conclusions: Death later than 5 years from diagnosis of a brain tumor in children is common and is usually due to progressive disease in slowly evolving low grade tumors. Death from a second malignant tumor becomes more frequent than  More>>
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 1995 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); PBD: 1 Feb 1995
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; CHILDREN; MORTALITY; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURVIVAL CURVES; SURVIVAL TIME
OSTI ID:
20391042
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3016; IOBPD3; TRN: US03R1429057389
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 445-451
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Jenkin, Derek, Greenberg, Mark, Hoffman, Harold, Hendrick, Bruce, Humphreys, Robin, and Vatter, Annette. Brain tumors in children: long-term survival after radiation treatment. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00393-Y.
Jenkin, Derek, Greenberg, Mark, Hoffman, Harold, Hendrick, Bruce, Humphreys, Robin, & Vatter, Annette. Brain tumors in children: long-term survival after radiation treatment. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00393-Y.
Jenkin, Derek, Greenberg, Mark, Hoffman, Harold, Hendrick, Bruce, Humphreys, Robin, and Vatter, Annette. 1995. "Brain tumors in children: long-term survival after radiation treatment." United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00393-Y. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0360-3016(94)00393-Y.
@misc{etde_20391042,
title = {Brain tumors in children: long-term survival after radiation treatment}
author = {Jenkin, Derek, Greenberg, Mark, Hoffman, Harold, Hendrick, Bruce, Humphreys, Robin, and Vatter, Annette}
abstractNote = {Purpose: To determine the cause of death in children who survive more than 5 years after radiation treatment of a brain tumor. Methods and Material: Nine hundred and twelve consecutive children with a primary brain tumor irradiated at the Princess Margaret Hospital or Toronto-Bayview Regional Cancer Center from 1958 to 1991, were evaluated for long-term outcome. Results: Overall 10- and 20-year survival rates were 44% and 37%. Subsequent survival of 377 5-year survivors was, at an additional 10 and 20 years, 78% and 67%. Most (83%) deaths that occurred more than 5 years from diagnosis were a result of relapse of the original tumor. The 10-year survival rate subsequent to relapse was 9% when the first relapse occurred less than one year from diagnosis, 17% for 1-2 years, and 31% when the time to relapse was 3 years or greater. The cumulative actuarial incidence of, and death from, second malignant tumors at 30 years from diagnosis was 18% and 13%, respectively. Conclusions: Death later than 5 years from diagnosis of a brain tumor in children is common and is usually due to progressive disease in slowly evolving low grade tumors. Death from a second malignant tumor becomes more frequent than death from the original tumor after 15 years from diagnosis.}
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(94)00393-Y}
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics}
issue = {3}
volume = {31}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1995}
month = {Feb}
}