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Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools

Journal Article:

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the biofilm formation on three different types of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400, S30466 and S31600) submerged in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The presence of microorganisms in coupons was characterised using standard culture microbiological methods, microscopic techniques (epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy), and molecular biology techniques (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing fragments of 16S rDNA). The microscopy techniques showed signs of colonisation of stainless steels in spite of these extreme conditions. Based on sequencing of cultured microorganisms, different bacteria belonging to {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}-Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria classes have been identified. The biofilm radioactivity was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry and, according to the data gathered, the radionuclides present in the water pool were entrapped in the biofilm increasing the amount of radiation at the surface of the different materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)
Authors:
Sarro, M I; Moreno, D A; Chicote, E; Lorenzo, P I; Garcia, A M; [1]  Montero, F [2] 
  1. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)
  2. Iberdrola Generacion, S.A., y C.M.D.S., Centro de Tecnologia de Materiales, Paseo de la Virgen del Puerto, 53, E-28005 Madrid (Spain)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2003
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials and Corrosion; Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs.. SICI: 0947-5117(200307)54:7<535::AID-MACO200390117>3.0.TX;2-V; PBD: Jul 2003
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; AUSTENITIC STEELS; BACILLUS; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; FILMS; RADIOACTIVITY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SPENT FUEL STORAGE; STAINLESS STEELS
OSTI ID:
20387884
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0947-5117; MTCREQ; TRN: DE03FB187
Availability:
Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/maco.200390117
Submitting Site:
DEN
Size:
page(s) 535-540
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Sarro, M I, Moreno, D A, Chicote, E, Lorenzo, P I, Garcia, A M, and Montero, F. Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools. Germany: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.1002/maco.200390117.
Sarro, M I, Moreno, D A, Chicote, E, Lorenzo, P I, Garcia, A M, & Montero, F. Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools. Germany. doi:10.1002/maco.200390117.
Sarro, M I, Moreno, D A, Chicote, E, Lorenzo, P I, Garcia, A M, and Montero, F. 2003. "Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools." Germany. doi:10.1002/maco.200390117. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1002/maco.200390117.
@misc{etde_20387884,
title = {Biofouling on austenitic stainless steels in spent nuclear fuel pools}
author = {Sarro, M I, Moreno, D A, Chicote, E, Lorenzo, P I, Garcia, A M, and Montero, F}
abstractNote = {The objective of this study was to investigate the biofilm formation on three different types of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400, S30466 and S31600) submerged in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The presence of microorganisms in coupons was characterised using standard culture microbiological methods, microscopic techniques (epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy), and molecular biology techniques (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing fragments of 16S rDNA). The microscopy techniques showed signs of colonisation of stainless steels in spite of these extreme conditions. Based on sequencing of cultured microorganisms, different bacteria belonging to {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}-Proteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria classes have been identified. The biofilm radioactivity was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry and, according to the data gathered, the radionuclides present in the water pool were entrapped in the biofilm increasing the amount of radiation at the surface of the different materials. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)}
doi = {10.1002/maco.200390117}
journal = {Materials and Corrosion}
issue = {7}
volume = {54}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {2003}
month = {Jul}
}