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The purification of organic reactor coolants; La purification des refrigerants organiques

Abstract

Among the main impurities present in irradiated and virgin coolants we have been particularly interested in chlorine, water, iron, oxygen and heavy elements. Our studies have been directed along two basic lines, namely: (1) the elimination of inorganic impurities, and (2) the elimination of organic impurities. The purpose of the studies on the elimination of inorganic impurities is to obtain a 'clean' coolant (virgin or used), this cleanness being marked by a low tendency to form deposits on the fuel element cladding (fouling corrosion). Careful attention has been paid to the problems of chlorine, water, iron and coated particles. Particular interest has been attached to research on deoxygenation of the organic liquid by catalytic hydrocracking, the oxygen (which comes from the dissociation of the water and the gases contained in the liquid) favouring polymerization and the formation of particles which are likely to be deposited on the hot walls. As regards the elimination of degradation products, many studies have been carried out with a view to permitting the maximum recycling of decomposed hydrocarbides and thus reducing the cost of make-up, the recycling rate being a function of the mean molecular weight and the viscosity of the recycled fractions. The technique  More>>
Authors:
Hannaert, H; Lopes Cardozo, R [1] 
  1. CCR EURATOM, Ispra, Varese (Italy)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1967
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
PL-194/5
Resource Relation:
Conference: Panel on the use of organic liquids as reactor coolants and moderators, Vienna (Austria), 9-13 May 1966; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1967; Related Information: In: Organic liquids as reactor coolants and moderators, Technical reports seriesno. 70, 154 pages.
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CHLORINE; CLADDING; CORROSION; DEPOSITS; FOULING; FUEL ELEMENTS; HEAVY NUCLEI; IRON; ORGANIC COOLANTS; OXYGEN; PURIFICATION; WATER
OSTI ID:
20385689
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
French
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0301983065202
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 137-138
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Hannaert, H, and Lopes Cardozo, R. The purification of organic reactor coolants; La purification des refrigerants organiques. IAEA: N. p., 1967. Web.
Hannaert, H, & Lopes Cardozo, R. The purification of organic reactor coolants; La purification des refrigerants organiques. IAEA.
Hannaert, H, and Lopes Cardozo, R. 1967. "The purification of organic reactor coolants; La purification des refrigerants organiques." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20385689,
title = {The purification of organic reactor coolants; La purification des refrigerants organiques}
author = {Hannaert, H, and Lopes Cardozo, R}
abstractNote = {Among the main impurities present in irradiated and virgin coolants we have been particularly interested in chlorine, water, iron, oxygen and heavy elements. Our studies have been directed along two basic lines, namely: (1) the elimination of inorganic impurities, and (2) the elimination of organic impurities. The purpose of the studies on the elimination of inorganic impurities is to obtain a 'clean' coolant (virgin or used), this cleanness being marked by a low tendency to form deposits on the fuel element cladding (fouling corrosion). Careful attention has been paid to the problems of chlorine, water, iron and coated particles. Particular interest has been attached to research on deoxygenation of the organic liquid by catalytic hydrocracking, the oxygen (which comes from the dissociation of the water and the gases contained in the liquid) favouring polymerization and the formation of particles which are likely to be deposited on the hot walls. As regards the elimination of degradation products, many studies have been carried out with a view to permitting the maximum recycling of decomposed hydrocarbides and thus reducing the cost of make-up, the recycling rate being a function of the mean molecular weight and the viscosity of the recycled fractions. The technique based on solvent extraction has led to very satisfactory results. An extension of this technique, using counter-flow extraction, appears to be even more promising. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1967}
month = {Jan}
}