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Stress fractures in military training

Journal Article:

Abstract

During military training, the incidence of overuse injuries like stress fractures increase. The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of bone scan in a military population with clinical suspected stress fractures or periostitis. Material and methods: A three-year retrospective analysis was made on patients who were clinically diagnosed with stress fractures at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Thirty-seven patients were studied (mean age 23. +/- 8 y.o; 31 males), 28 cases of which (76%) had tibial stress syndrome. Other localizations were lumbar spine, femoral, fibular, tarsal or metatarsal. Bone scintigraphy was performed injecting 1036 MBq of Tc99m-MDP i.v. Whole body images and lateral projections of lower extremities were done. Results: Bone scan in tibial syndrome was positive for 23 cases (82%), 65% of them were bilateral and 13% also had femoral injuries. X-rays were done in 10 cases and were all negative. In other localizations, the bone scans were negative, but demonstrated other degenerative lesions. All stress fractures were conservatively treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and suspension of physical activity. Conclusions: Bone scan is a reliable confirmatory tool for tibial stress syndrome diagnosis. In addition, it helps to determine both the severity and extension of the injury  More>>
Authors:
Jofre, M J; Sierralta, M P [1] 
  1. Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department, Santiago (Chile)
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 2002
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: World Journal of Nuclear Medicine; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: suppl.2; Conference: 8. Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Santiago (Chile), 29 Sep - 2 Oct 2002; Other Information: PBD: Sep 2002
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BONE FRACTURES; BONE TISSUES; EXERCISE; HEALING; MILITARY PERSONNEL; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; SCINTISCANNING; SKELETON; TECHNETIUM 99
OSTI ID:
20350522
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1450-1147; TRN: XA03W0530035589
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 241
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Jofre, M J, and Sierralta, M P. Stress fractures in military training. IAEA: N. p., 2002. Web.
Jofre, M J, & Sierralta, M P. Stress fractures in military training. IAEA.
Jofre, M J, and Sierralta, M P. 2002. "Stress fractures in military training." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20350522,
title = {Stress fractures in military training}
author = {Jofre, M J, and Sierralta, M P}
abstractNote = {During military training, the incidence of overuse injuries like stress fractures increase. The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of bone scan in a military population with clinical suspected stress fractures or periostitis. Material and methods: A three-year retrospective analysis was made on patients who were clinically diagnosed with stress fractures at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Thirty-seven patients were studied (mean age 23. +/- 8 y.o; 31 males), 28 cases of which (76%) had tibial stress syndrome. Other localizations were lumbar spine, femoral, fibular, tarsal or metatarsal. Bone scintigraphy was performed injecting 1036 MBq of Tc99m-MDP i.v. Whole body images and lateral projections of lower extremities were done. Results: Bone scan in tibial syndrome was positive for 23 cases (82%), 65% of them were bilateral and 13% also had femoral injuries. X-rays were done in 10 cases and were all negative. In other localizations, the bone scans were negative, but demonstrated other degenerative lesions. All stress fractures were conservatively treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and suspension of physical activity. Conclusions: Bone scan is a reliable confirmatory tool for tibial stress syndrome diagnosis. In addition, it helps to determine both the severity and extension of the injury as well as support the indication of rest in the military population.}
journal = {World Journal of Nuclear Medicine}
issue = {suppl.2}
volume = {1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2002}
month = {Sep}
}