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International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

Abstract

The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2002
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IAEA-CN-96
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry, Vienna (Austria), 25-28 Nov 2002; Other Information: Refs, figs, tabs; PBD: 2002
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; CALIBRATION STANDARDS; CALORIMETRIC DOSEMETERS; DOSEMETERS; DOSIMETRY; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; LEADING ABSTRACT; MEETINGS; MEASURING METHODS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SSDL
OSTI ID:
20328679
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); European Commission, Directorate-General Environment, Brussels (Belgium); European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); International Organization for Medical Physics, San Antonio, TX (United States); Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC (United States); American Association of Physicists in Medicine, New York (United States); European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, York (United Kingdom); International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); International Society for Radiation Oncology, Brussels (Belgium); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0203798017828
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
276 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses. IAEA: N. p., 2002. Web.
International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses. IAEA.
2002. "International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20328679,
title = {International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses}
abstractNote = {The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in {sup 60}Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and satisfies the requirements of international and national regulatory bodies for patient safety. A culture of quality assurance and the need for scientific exchange at the international level have extended the requirements for standardization to many other areas. These include radiotherapy with heavy charged particles, brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. A major advance in radiotherapy over the past few years has been the growing use of proton and heavy ion irradiation facilities for cancer therapy. The increased use of brachytherapy, including the new application of intravascular brachytherapy, has resulted in the development of new standards and codes of practice in this area. In diagnostic radiology, including computed tomography (CT), mammography and interventional procedures, the awareness of the importance of dose reduction to the patient has also lead to the development of codes of practice. In the field of nuclear medicine there is a need to increase the dissemination of standards and the development of international recommendations for dosimetry procedures. Every year there are several regional or international meetings on radiation physics applied to medicine or related areas. A meeting focused exclusively on dosimetry gives the unique opportunity to review in depth the developments and trends in this continuously changing field. By organizing this Symposium the IAEA maintains its longstanding tradition of disseminating knowledge, promoting expertise and supporting international co-operation in radiation dosimetry. The Symposium provided a forum where advances in radiation dosimetry during the past decade, not only in external beam radiotherapy but also in other areas of radiation medicine, can be disseminated and scientific knowledge exchanged. It will include areas that have been developed recently (e.g. intravascular therapy and hadron dosimetry), together with classic areas where the standardization of dosimetry may not have reached a mature stage (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine). It will also summarize the present status and outline future trends in medical radiation dosimetry and identify possible areas for improvement. Its conclusions and summaries should lead to the formulation of recommendations for the scientific community.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2002}
month = {Jul}
}