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Multi-functional energy plantation; Multifunktionella bioenergiodlingar

Abstract

There exists a significant potential for utilising perennial energy plantations in protecting and restoring polluted water and land resources in Sweden. By optimising the design, location and management, several additional environmental services could be obtained which will increase the value of the energy plantations, thereby improving future market conditions for biomass. Multi-functional energy plantations (mainly Salix but also energy grass) can be divided into two categories, those designed for dedicated environmental services (e.g. vegetation filters for wastewater and sewage sludge treatment and shelter belts against soil erosion), and those generating more general benefits (e.g. soil carbon accumulation, increased soil fertility, cadmium removal and increased hunting potential). The practical potential of those two categories is estimated to be equivalent to up to 3% and more than 20% of the total Swedish arable land, respectively. The regional conditions of utilising multi-functional plantations vary, however, with the best possibilities in densely populated areas dominated by farmland. The economic value of multi-functional plantations is normally highest for those designed for dedicated environmental services. Purification of wastewater has the highest value, which could exceed the production cost in conventional Salix plantations, followed by treatment of polluted drainage water in vegetation filters and buffer zones (equivalent  More>>
Authors:
Boerjesson, Paal; [1]  Berndes, Goeran; Fredriksson, Fredrik; [2]  Kaaberger, Tomas [3] 
  1. Lund Univ. (Sweden). Environmental and Energy Systems Studies
  2. Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Resource Theory
  3. Ecotraffic, Goeteborg (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 2002
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
STEM-EO-02-4
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 90 refs., 13 figs., 42 tabs; PBD: Feb 2002
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; WILLOWS; BIOMASS PLANTATIONS; SHORT ROTATION CULTIVATION; GRAMINEAE; SWEDEN; POLLUTION ABATEMENT; WASTE WATER; AGRICULTURE; WATER TREATMENT; EROSION CONTROL
OSTI ID:
20300159
Research Organizations:
Swedish Energy Agency, Eskilstuna (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
Swedish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: Project STEM-P12293-1; TRN: SE0207419
Availability:
Also available from: Studsvik Library, SE-611 82 Nykoeping, Sweden (SEK 195); Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20300159
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
114 pages
Announcement Date:
Feb 19, 2003

Citation Formats

Boerjesson, Paal, Berndes, Goeran, Fredriksson, Fredrik, and Kaaberger, Tomas. Multi-functional energy plantation; Multifunktionella bioenergiodlingar. Sweden: N. p., 2002. Web.
Boerjesson, Paal, Berndes, Goeran, Fredriksson, Fredrik, & Kaaberger, Tomas. Multi-functional energy plantation; Multifunktionella bioenergiodlingar. Sweden.
Boerjesson, Paal, Berndes, Goeran, Fredriksson, Fredrik, and Kaaberger, Tomas. 2002. "Multi-functional energy plantation; Multifunktionella bioenergiodlingar." Sweden.
@misc{etde_20300159,
title = {Multi-functional energy plantation; Multifunktionella bioenergiodlingar}
author = {Boerjesson, Paal, Berndes, Goeran, Fredriksson, Fredrik, and Kaaberger, Tomas}
abstractNote = {There exists a significant potential for utilising perennial energy plantations in protecting and restoring polluted water and land resources in Sweden. By optimising the design, location and management, several additional environmental services could be obtained which will increase the value of the energy plantations, thereby improving future market conditions for biomass. Multi-functional energy plantations (mainly Salix but also energy grass) can be divided into two categories, those designed for dedicated environmental services (e.g. vegetation filters for wastewater and sewage sludge treatment and shelter belts against soil erosion), and those generating more general benefits (e.g. soil carbon accumulation, increased soil fertility, cadmium removal and increased hunting potential). The practical potential of those two categories is estimated to be equivalent to up to 3% and more than 20% of the total Swedish arable land, respectively. The regional conditions of utilising multi-functional plantations vary, however, with the best possibilities in densely populated areas dominated by farmland. The economic value of multi-functional plantations is normally highest for those designed for dedicated environmental services. Purification of wastewater has the highest value, which could exceed the production cost in conventional Salix plantations, followed by treatment of polluted drainage water in vegetation filters and buffer zones (equivalent to more than half of the production cost), recirculation of sewage sludge (around half of the production cost), erosion control (around one fourth) and increased hunting potential (up to 15% of the production cost). The value of increased hunting potential varies due to nearness to larger cities and in which part of Sweden the plantation is located. The economic value of cadmium removal and increased soil fertility is equivalent to a few percent of the production cost, but the value of cadmium removal might increase in the future if this problem will be valued differently. The value of increased carbon accumulation in mineral soils and reduced carbon dioxide emissions from organic soils is estimated to be equivalent to a few percent and half the production cost in conventional Salix plantations, respectively. These values may also change in the future if carbon sinks in agriculture will be included as an approved mitigation option within the Kyoto agreement. Based on an analysis of possible combinations of environmental services achieved in specific plantations, it is estimated that biomass can be produced to an negative cost in around 100,000 hectares of multi-functional energy plantations, when the value of the environmental services is included. The production cost in another 250,000 hectares of plantations is estimated to be halved. This is equivalent to around 6 and 11 TWh biomass per year, respectively. Economic incentives also exist for municipal wastewater plants for utilising vegetation filters for wastewater and sewage sludge treatment. Cadmium removal and increased soil fertility will give a minor increase in the income for the farmer. However, cadmium removal will result in increased costs later in the Salix fuel chain, due to increased costs of flue gas cleaning during combustion. Thus, to overcome this economic barrier, subsidies will probably be needed to heating plants utilising cadmium-contaminated biomass. The possibilities of achieving an income from increased soil carbon accumulation will depend on if this option will be an approved mechanism. Today, the Swedish greenhouse gas mitigation policy does not include this option. Some of the potential multi-functional energy plantations (e.g. buffer strips for reducing nutrient leaching and vegetation filters for treatment of polluted drainage water) results in increased cultivation costs for the farmer, thus increased economic barriers. Examples of measures to overcome such barriers are dedicated subsidies for multi-functional plantations established at specific locations, or on a certain type of soil. The concept of multi-functional energy plantations accentuate the need of synchronising agricultural, environmental and energy policies. Structural barriers, such as farm size, type of production etc., are relevant both for conventional and multi-functional energy production. It is here estimated that the risk of such barriers is lowest in regions with intensively managed farmland which normally holds a higher share of large farms producing food crops. These regions also have the highest need for the environmental services discussed here. The occurrence of technical/physical barriers in form of possible future limitations in the need of energy crops varies between different regions in Sweden. In some counties in forest regions there exist a surplus of biomass in form of forest fuels, also when the need of biomass increase significantly in the future. (abstract truncated)}
place = {Sweden}
year = {2002}
month = {Feb}
}