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Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences

Abstract

The IMR group investigated some new approaches to tumour therapy. Several candidate molecules for targeting the tumour vasculature have been identified and are being produced for in vivo studies in tumour-bearing mice. The liposome technology is well established in this group and the goal is to produce suitably tagged liposomes for delivering a variety of cytotoxic agents to tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science, a joint venture with the ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, pursues a number of projects that should eventually lead to novel radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. Functionally, these radioactive drugs consist of a tumour targeting part, a radionuclide and a linking moiety, which stably connects the two. Optimisation of the components and their combination in terms of in vitro and in vivo properties as well as the efficient large-scale production of promising candidates for eventual first clinical trials is a demanding task. The major emphasis is still on using antibodies, antibody derivatives or peptides as tumour targeting vehicles. In collaboration with the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham, the first patients were treated with a {sup 67}Cu labelled antibody targeting bladder carcinomas. When completed, these studies should give us important information on the usefulness of  More>>
Authors:
Jaussi, R; Gschwend, B [1] 
  1. eds.
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 2002
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-CH-042A
Resource Relation:
Other Information: figs., tabs., refs; PBD: Mar 2002
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD VESSELS; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; DNA REPAIR; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; LEADING ABSTRACT; NEOPLASMS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; PROGRESS REPORT; RADIOBIOLOGY; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RADIOTHERAPY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; SWISS LIGHT SOURCE; SWITZERLAND; TUMOR CELLS
OSTI ID:
20282622
Research Organizations:
Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
Switzerland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1423-7318; TRN: CH0200041045324
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
CHN
Size:
83 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Jaussi, R, and Gschwend, B. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences. Switzerland: N. p., 2002. Web.
Jaussi, R, & Gschwend, B. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences. Switzerland.
Jaussi, R, and Gschwend, B. 2002. "Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences." Switzerland.
@misc{etde_20282622,
title = {Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences}
author = {Jaussi, R, and Gschwend, B}
abstractNote = {The IMR group investigated some new approaches to tumour therapy. Several candidate molecules for targeting the tumour vasculature have been identified and are being produced for in vivo studies in tumour-bearing mice. The liposome technology is well established in this group and the goal is to produce suitably tagged liposomes for delivering a variety of cytotoxic agents to tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science, a joint venture with the ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, pursues a number of projects that should eventually lead to novel radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. Functionally, these radioactive drugs consist of a tumour targeting part, a radionuclide and a linking moiety, which stably connects the two. Optimisation of the components and their combination in terms of in vitro and in vivo properties as well as the efficient large-scale production of promising candidates for eventual first clinical trials is a demanding task. The major emphasis is still on using antibodies, antibody derivatives or peptides as tumour targeting vehicles. In collaboration with the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham, the first patients were treated with a {sup 67}Cu labelled antibody targeting bladder carcinomas. When completed, these studies should give us important information on the usefulness of {sup 67}Cu as a therapeutic radionuclide. Neuropeptides such as neurotensin and bombesin are promising starting points for tumour targeting as their receptors are over expressed on certain tumour cells. Presently, the efforts concentrate on preparing for further clinical studies with neurotensin derivatives (diagnosis of pancreatic tumours using {sup 99m}Tc) and further improving the stability and pharmacological properties of bombesin derivatives. In both these projects the ultimate goal is to label the optimised compounds with {sup 186}Re, a therapeutic radionuclide that can be attached in the stable tricarbonyl form which is easily accessible by a procedure developed in this laboratory. In vivo molecular imaging methods have important applications in disease diagnosis, in drug development and, increasingly, in monitoring the expression of genes introduced through gene therapy vectors. The PET tracer group of the Center for Radiopharmaceutical Science has successfully started operation of the new HIDAC camera, which is optimally suited to study new tracers during their development in small animals. Presently, the major efforts are in developing tracers for imaging glutamatergic and nicotinergic receptors of the brain as well as for amyloid plaques, the characteristic markers of Alzheimer disease. In the division of radiation medicine 27 patients have been treated on the Spot Scanning Gantry in this fifth beam period. In the OPTIS program, nearly 200 patients were treated for ocular tumours in 2001. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.}
place = {Switzerland}
year = {2002}
month = {Mar}
}