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Biofuels from the forest. A study of environmental impacts and economy of different uses; Biobraensle fraan skogen. En studie av miljoekonsekvenser och ekonomi foer olika anvaendningar

Abstract

The energy and environmental council of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences initiated this study of how an additional 30 TWh/year of forest biofuel could be used in the Swedish energy system within a 10-year period. The specifications include that the forest biofuel shall be used in such a manner that the greatest possible reduction in carbon dioxide emissions will be achieved at the lowest cost without risking other environmental goals, such as good quality of local air. The figure chosen as starting point for the study, 30 TWh/year, was selected as it is this amount that available data have suggested could be extracted without negatively affecting the long-term productive capacity of forest land. The long-term potential of biofuel will probably be much larger than the volume used today, together with the additional use of 30 TWh/yr. We therefore studied fields of use that, totally, will be considerably larger than 30 TWh/yr. The starting point for comparisons of different uses for forest biofuel was the available benefit/utility for industrial, transportation and service sectors, together with domestic uses. The reference alternative was the existing uses of fossil fuels. Comparisons of different alternatives were made including differences in fuel consumption, CO{sub  More>>
Authors:
Ekstroem, Clas; Amnell, Goesta; Anheden, Marie; Eidensten, Lars; Kirkegaard, Gunilla [1] 
  1. Vattenfall Utveckling AB (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Apr 01, 2002
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
STEM-ER-9-2002
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 44 refs, 75 figs, 25 tabs; PBD: Apr 2002
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; WOOD FUELS; SWEDEN; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FORESTRY; CARBON DIOXIDE; GREENHOUSE GASES; TAXES; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT
OSTI ID:
20269864
Research Organizations:
Swedish Energy Agency, Eskilstuna (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
Swedish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1403-1892; TRN: SE0207311
Availability:
Also available from: Energimyndigheten, Publikationsservice, Box 310, SE-631 04 Eskilstuna, Sweden or from: www.stem.se; Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20269864
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
155 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Ekstroem, Clas, Amnell, Goesta, Anheden, Marie, Eidensten, Lars, and Kirkegaard, Gunilla. Biofuels from the forest. A study of environmental impacts and economy of different uses; Biobraensle fraan skogen. En studie av miljoekonsekvenser och ekonomi foer olika anvaendningar. Sweden: N. p., 2002. Web.
Ekstroem, Clas, Amnell, Goesta, Anheden, Marie, Eidensten, Lars, & Kirkegaard, Gunilla. Biofuels from the forest. A study of environmental impacts and economy of different uses; Biobraensle fraan skogen. En studie av miljoekonsekvenser och ekonomi foer olika anvaendningar. Sweden.
Ekstroem, Clas, Amnell, Goesta, Anheden, Marie, Eidensten, Lars, and Kirkegaard, Gunilla. 2002. "Biofuels from the forest. A study of environmental impacts and economy of different uses; Biobraensle fraan skogen. En studie av miljoekonsekvenser och ekonomi foer olika anvaendningar." Sweden.
@misc{etde_20269864,
title = {Biofuels from the forest. A study of environmental impacts and economy of different uses; Biobraensle fraan skogen. En studie av miljoekonsekvenser och ekonomi foer olika anvaendningar}
author = {Ekstroem, Clas, Amnell, Goesta, Anheden, Marie, Eidensten, Lars, and Kirkegaard, Gunilla}
abstractNote = {The energy and environmental council of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences initiated this study of how an additional 30 TWh/year of forest biofuel could be used in the Swedish energy system within a 10-year period. The specifications include that the forest biofuel shall be used in such a manner that the greatest possible reduction in carbon dioxide emissions will be achieved at the lowest cost without risking other environmental goals, such as good quality of local air. The figure chosen as starting point for the study, 30 TWh/year, was selected as it is this amount that available data have suggested could be extracted without negatively affecting the long-term productive capacity of forest land. The long-term potential of biofuel will probably be much larger than the volume used today, together with the additional use of 30 TWh/yr. We therefore studied fields of use that, totally, will be considerably larger than 30 TWh/yr. The starting point for comparisons of different uses for forest biofuel was the available benefit/utility for industrial, transportation and service sectors, together with domestic uses. The reference alternative was the existing uses of fossil fuels. Comparisons of different alternatives were made including differences in fuel consumption, CO{sub 2} emissions, emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust, as well as costs without environmental and energy taxes or subsidies. Monetary estimations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust in accordance with the EU ExternE Project were included in the costs. In our study, we have used two scenarios as starting points in order to cover the range of results. Summary of results: The largest reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions (generally about 0.6-1 Mtonnes CO{sub 2} /TWh forest biofuel and for heat pumps slightly more than 2 Mtonnes CO{sub 2}/TWh forest fuel) at the lowest cost are obtained when bioenergy replaces electricity produced by coal fired condensing power stations in neighbouring countries. In some of these cases, bioenergy would not imply any additional cost in comparison with the use of electricity produced by coal condensing plants. In most other cases the estimated additional costs will not be higher than about 60 SEK/tonne reduced CO{sub 2} emissions (up to 90 SEK/MWh electricity). If bioenergy in cases with additional costs is to replace electricity from coal condensing plants it is necessary to place a price on the CO{sub 2} emissions by coal power stations and/or submit them to carbon dioxide taxation. This is not the case today. Pellet boilers in multi-family houses can utilise considerable amounts of forest biofuel and provide heating at lower costs than electric boilers. District heating and cogeneration of power and district heating can also utilise large volumes of forest biofuel (up to 20 TWh resulting in more than 12 Mtonnes/year reduced CO{sub 2} emissions) at low added costs (about 60 SEK/tonne reduced CO{sub 2} emissions corresponding to 20-40 SEK/MWh district heating) in comparison with fossil alternatives. Emissions of other air pollutants can then more easily be minimised and will occur further from built-up areas. The amount of electricity that can be produced from forest biofuel at these low added costs in comparison with fossil alternatives is restricted by the level of district-heating production. Today the power transmission systems permit only limited exports of electrical power, and consequently important reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at low cost if electricity from biofuel-fired cogeneration plants, that cannot be exported, is used by new heat pumps in villas. This would also give lower emissions of other air pollutants in urban areas than if pellets or oil were used to fire the villa boilers. Heat pumps and pellet boilers will be the most favourable forest biofuel based heating alternative for villas heated by water radiators. Heat pumps give greater reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions at lower cost provided they can be assumed to be powered by electricity obtained from a forest biofuel based cogeneration plant. If transmission of electricity between Sweden and northern Europe could take place with considerably less physical restrictions than the case today, then the largest CO{sub 2} reductions at the lowest added costs would be obtained through maximal production of district heating and cogeneration electricity, heating of homes and premises that are not linked to the district heating using pellet boilers instead of electric boilers, and by reducing consumption of electricity in villas with direct electric heating by introduction of pellet stoves. In this scenario, the use of heat pumps in villas instead of electric boilers would mean reduced consumption of electricity produced by coal condensing plants and thus result in reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. However, this cannot be related to the use of forest biofuel. (abstract truncated)}
place = {Sweden}
year = {2002}
month = {Apr}
}