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Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material

Abstract

At present nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of total electricity generation worldwide. Given continuing population growth and the needs of the third world and developing countries to improve their economic performance and standard of living, energy demand is expected to continue to grow through the 21st century. The proportion of energy supplied as electricity is also expected to continue to increase. Although fossil fuelled electricity generation is the option preferred by several countries for the short term, there are rising concerns over climatic consequences caused by extended burning of fossil fuels as a result of the demands of a fast expanding world population. In this situation nuclear electricity will become more and more important and the known reserves of uranium would be consumed quite quickly by thermal reactors. It would be possible to sustain a large nuclear programme only by introducing fast reactors. One can conclude that there are strategic reasons for pursuing the development of fast breeder reactors. It will become desirable essential, to have this technology available for introduction. The experience of the various prototypes presently in operation has confirmed the operability and benign characteristics of the LMFR and has given ground for confidence in the future.  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IWGFR-86; IAEA-TC-385.53
Resource Relation:
Conference: 25. annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors, Vienna (Austria), 27-30 Apr 1992; Other Information: Figs, tabs, 1 ill; PBD: 1992
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; IAEA; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; LMFBR TYPE REACTORS; PLUTONIUM; POWER GENERATION; REACTOR SAFETY; REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; RECYCLING; SAFETY STANDARDS; URANIUM
OSTI ID:
20251442
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, International Working Group on Fast Reactors, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0201669021480
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
280 pages
Announcement Date:
Jun 11, 2002

Citation Formats

None. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material. IAEA: N. p., 1992. Web.
None. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material. IAEA.
None. 1992. "Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20251442,
title = {Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material}
author = {None}
abstractNote = {At present nuclear power accounts for approximately 17% of total electricity generation worldwide. Given continuing population growth and the needs of the third world and developing countries to improve their economic performance and standard of living, energy demand is expected to continue to grow through the 21st century. The proportion of energy supplied as electricity is also expected to continue to increase. Although fossil fuelled electricity generation is the option preferred by several countries for the short term, there are rising concerns over climatic consequences caused by extended burning of fossil fuels as a result of the demands of a fast expanding world population. In this situation nuclear electricity will become more and more important and the known reserves of uranium would be consumed quite quickly by thermal reactors. It would be possible to sustain a large nuclear programme only by introducing fast reactors. One can conclude that there are strategic reasons for pursuing the development of fast breeder reactors. It will become desirable essential, to have this technology available for introduction. The experience of the various prototypes presently in operation has confirmed the operability and benign characteristics of the LMFR and has given ground for confidence in the future. Current fast reactor designs offer very large margins of safety and by virtue of redundant and diverse safety systems the potential for an energetic core disruptive accident or for fast reactor core meltdown has been essentially eliminated. Several international forums reviewed the current trends in the fast reactor development. The view was reaffirmed that fast breeder reactors still remain the most practical tool for effective utilization of uranium resources for the future energy needs. Achievement of competitiveness with LMRs is still the first priority condition for the future deployment of this type of reactor. The recycling of plutonium into LMFBRs would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long-life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. This additional important mission for the LMFBR is gaining worldwide interest. In the framework of disarmament of nuclear weapons and the utilization of the nuclear material for peaceful purposes a role for fast reactors can be also considered. Over the past 25 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in Fast Breeder Reactor Technology. At the present time the Working Group on Fast Reactors is the oldest and one of the most active groups in the Division of Nuclear Power. The present document contains information on the status of fast breeder reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1991, as reported at the 25th jubilee Annual Meeting of the IWGFR in Vienna, 27-30 April 1992. The publication is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFBR development in IAEA Member States and CEC.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1992}
month = {Jul}
}