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Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

Abstract

In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 2002
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-1273
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs, figs, tabs; PBD: Feb 2002
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; AGING; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; DECONTAMINATION; IAEA; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; LEADING ABSTRACT; MEMBER STATES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING; REACTOR DISMANTLING; REMOTE HANDLING; RESEARCH REACTORS
OSTI ID:
20248927
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-4289; TRN: XA0201610020070
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
266 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001. IAEA: N. p., 2002. Web.
Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001. IAEA.
2002. "Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20248927,
title = {Decommissioning techniques for research reactors. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001}
abstractNote = {In its international role, the IAEA is faced with a wide variety of national situations and different availability of technical, human and financial resources. While it is recognised that nuclear decommissioning is a mature industry in some developed countries, and may soon become a routine activity, the situation is by no means so clear in other countries. In addition, transfer of technologies and know-how from developed to developing countries is not a spontaneous, straightforward process, and will take time and considerable effort. As mandated by its own statute and Member States' requests, the IAEA continues to respond to its Member States by monitoring technological progress, ensuring development of safer and more efficient strategies and fostering international information exchange. Previous co-ordinated research projects (CRP) conducted respectively from 1984 to 1987, and from 1989 to 1993, investigated the overall domain of decommissioning. In those CRPs no distinction was made between decommissioning activities carried out at nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear fuel cycle facilities. With technological progress and experience gained, it became clear that decommissioning of research reactors had certain specific characteristics which needed a dedicated approach. In addition, a large number of research reactors reached a state of permanent shutdown in the 1990s and were candidates for prompt decommissioning. With the progressive ageing of research reactors, many more of these units will soon become redundant worldwide and require decommissioning. Within this context, a CRP on Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors was launched and conducted by the IAEA from 1997 to 2001 in order to prepare for eventual decommissioning. Concluding reports that summarized the work undertaken under the aegis of the CRP were presented at the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Kendal, United Kingdom, 14-18 May 2001, and are collected in this technical publication. Operating experience in real-scale applications, lessons learned, key results in laboratory scale or pilot scale research, and validation of mathematical models, are among the most significant achievements of the CRP and have been highlighted. The objective of this CRP was to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience gained by Member States in decommissioning or operation, maintenance, and refurbishment activities which would be eventually related to the decommissioning of research reactors. Special emphasis was given to the development/adaptation of methods and approaches for optimization of the decommissioning process. The scope of the project included several technical areas of decommissioning rather than focusing on a single aspect of it. It was felt that this format would generate more awareness of the integrated approach to decommissioning. In particular, the scope included the following: design, construction and operational features to assist in final decommissioning; planning for decommissioning, including technical solution assessment; decommissioning strategies and their technological implications; radiological and physical characterization; dismantling technology; decontamination technology; remotely operated equipment; means to reduce occupational exposures; waste generation and management, including clearance of solid materials; restricted and unrestricted site release, including final surveys; costs and financial provisions; safe enclosure of shutdown reactors, including long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decommissioning experience; and ageing management and refurbishment experience.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2002}
month = {Feb}
}