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Toronto air quality index health links analysis

Miscellaneous:

Abstract

Based on data acquired in the year 1995, Toronto Public Health published a report called Air Pollution Burden of Illness in Toronto. In that report, it was estimated that up to 1000 Toronto residents die prematurely each year while another 5500 are admitted to hospitals due to six smog-related air pollutants. In the present document, the authors examined the air quality classifications of the Ontario Air Quality Index (AQI) in an attempt to determine whether the values adequately reflect the state of air quality and the associated burden of illness in Toronto. After careful examination of the results, it became apparent that 92 per cent of the premature mortality and hospitalization took place at times when the Air Quality Index was in the very good or good range. At times when the Air Quality Index was in the moderate or poor-very poor range, an estimated 8 per cent of the burden of illness occurred. These results indicate that the concentration range of a pollutant used to classify the good and very good categories is not always in agreement with the pollutant levels responsible for the adverse health effects. As demonstrated by this study, the air quality associated with the very  More>>
Authors:
Pengelly, D; [1]  Campbell, M; Macfarlane, R; Li-Muller, A [2] 
  1. McMaster Inst. of Environment and Health, Hamilton, ON (Canada)
  2. Toronto Public Health, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 2001
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 2001
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; AIR QUALITY; PUBLIC HEALTH; SMOG; URBAN AREAS; ONTARIO
Sponsoring Organizations:
Salamander Foundation, Toronto, ON (Canada)
OSTI ID:
20222673
Research Organizations:
Toronto Public Health, ON (Canada). Health Promotion and Environmental Protection Office
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: CA0200141
Availability:
Available from Health Promotion and Environmental Protection Office, Toronto Public Health, 277 Victoria Street, 7th Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5B 1W2 or at www.city.toronto.on.ca/health
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
49 pages
Announcement Date:

Miscellaneous:

Citation Formats

Pengelly, D, Campbell, M, Macfarlane, R, and Li-Muller, A. Toronto air quality index health links analysis. Canada: N. p., 2001. Web.
Pengelly, D, Campbell, M, Macfarlane, R, & Li-Muller, A. Toronto air quality index health links analysis. Canada.
Pengelly, D, Campbell, M, Macfarlane, R, and Li-Muller, A. 2001. "Toronto air quality index health links analysis." Canada.
@misc{etde_20222673,
title = {Toronto air quality index health links analysis}
author = {Pengelly, D, Campbell, M, Macfarlane, R, and Li-Muller, A}
abstractNote = {Based on data acquired in the year 1995, Toronto Public Health published a report called Air Pollution Burden of Illness in Toronto. In that report, it was estimated that up to 1000 Toronto residents die prematurely each year while another 5500 are admitted to hospitals due to six smog-related air pollutants. In the present document, the authors examined the air quality classifications of the Ontario Air Quality Index (AQI) in an attempt to determine whether the values adequately reflect the state of air quality and the associated burden of illness in Toronto. After careful examination of the results, it became apparent that 92 per cent of the premature mortality and hospitalization took place at times when the Air Quality Index was in the very good or good range. At times when the Air Quality Index was in the moderate or poor-very poor range, an estimated 8 per cent of the burden of illness occurred. These results indicate that the concentration range of a pollutant used to classify the good and very good categories is not always in agreement with the pollutant levels responsible for the adverse health effects. As demonstrated by this study, the air quality associated with the very good or good range described by the AQI is responsible for negative health effects in Toronto, and are lower than the provincial criteria of Ontario. The air quality conditions that may have an impact on health are not always correctly identified by the current AQI system. The authors are recommending a review of the provincial criteria for several air pollutants, and the current AQI system needs to be modified. 16 refs., tabs., figs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {2001}
month = {Oct}
}