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Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks

Abstract

This work contributes to the research on control, optimization and simulation of gas transmission systems to support the dispatch personnel at gas control centres for the decision makings in the daily operation of the natural gas transportation systems. Different control and optimization strategies have been studied. The focus is on the operation of long distance natural gas transportation systems. Stationary optimization in conjunction with linear model predictive control using state space models is proposed for supply security, the control of quality parameters and minimization of transportation costs for networks offering transportation services. The result from the stationary optimization together with a reformulation of a simplified fluid flow model formulates a linear dynamic optimization model. This model is used in a finite time control and state constrained linear model predictive controller. The deviation from the control and the state reference determined from the stationary optimization is penalized quadratically. Because of the time varying status of infrastructure, the control space is also generally time varying. When the average load is expected to change considerably, a new stationary optimization is performed, giving a new state and control reference together with a new dynamic model that is used for both optimization and state estimation.  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2001
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Report Number:
NEI-NO-1357
Resource Relation:
Other Information: TH: Thesis (Dr. Ing); 119 refs., 74 figs.; PBD: 2001
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; ENERGY; NATURAL GAS; CONTROL; OPTIMIZATION; NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; GAS UTILITIES; NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; FLUID FLOW
OSTI ID:
20208252
Research Organizations:
Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim (Norway)
Country of Origin:
Norway
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 82-7984-143-1; TRN: NO0105388
Availability:
Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20208252
Submitting Site:
NW
Size:
312 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Hofsten, Kai. Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks. Norway: N. p., 2001. Web.
Hofsten, Kai. Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks. Norway.
Hofsten, Kai. 2001. "Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks." Norway.
@misc{etde_20208252,
title = {Model-based dynamic control and optimization of gas networks}
author = {Hofsten, Kai}
abstractNote = {This work contributes to the research on control, optimization and simulation of gas transmission systems to support the dispatch personnel at gas control centres for the decision makings in the daily operation of the natural gas transportation systems. Different control and optimization strategies have been studied. The focus is on the operation of long distance natural gas transportation systems. Stationary optimization in conjunction with linear model predictive control using state space models is proposed for supply security, the control of quality parameters and minimization of transportation costs for networks offering transportation services. The result from the stationary optimization together with a reformulation of a simplified fluid flow model formulates a linear dynamic optimization model. This model is used in a finite time control and state constrained linear model predictive controller. The deviation from the control and the state reference determined from the stationary optimization is penalized quadratically. Because of the time varying status of infrastructure, the control space is also generally time varying. When the average load is expected to change considerably, a new stationary optimization is performed, giving a new state and control reference together with a new dynamic model that is used for both optimization and state estimation. Another proposed control strategy is a control and output constrained nonlinear model predictive controller for the operation of gas transmission systems. Here, the objective is also the security of the supply, quality control and minimization of transportation costs. An output vector is defined, which together with a control vector are both penalized quadratically from their respective references in the objective function. The nonlinear model predictive controller can be combined with a stationary optimization. At each sampling instant, a non convex nonlinear programming problem is solved giving a local minimum by a structured sequential quadratic programming algorithm of Newton type. Each open loop problem is specified using a nonlinear prediction model. For each iteration of the quadratic programming procedure, a linear time variant prediction model is formulated. The suggested controller also handles time varying source capacity. Potential problems such as infeasibility and the security of the supply when facing a change in the status of the infrastructure of the transmission system under a transient customer load are treated. Comments on the infeasibility due to errors such as load forecast error, model error and state estimation error are also discussed. A simplified nonlinear model called the creep flow model is used to describe the fluid dynamics inside a natural gas transmission line. Different assumptions and reformulations of this model yield the different control, simulation and optimization models used in this thesis. The control of a single gas transmission line is investigated using linear model predictive control based on instant linearization of the nonlinear model. Model predictive control using a bi quadratic optimization model formulated from the creep flow model is also investigated. A distributed parameter control model of the gas dynamics for a transmission line is formulated. An analytic solution of this model is given with both Neuman boundary conditions and distributed supplies and loads. A transfer function model is developed expressing the dynamics between the defined output and the control and disturbance inputs of the transmission line. Based on the qualitative behaviour observed from the step responses of the solutions of the distributed parameter model formulated in this thesis, simplified transfer function models were developed. These control models expresses the dynamics of a natural gas transmission line with Neuman boundary control and load. Further, these models were used to design a control law, which is a combination of a Smith predictor and feed forward from a predicted load pattern. A boundary control model assumed to describe the fluid dynamics of a long distance transmission line was defined. Then, a control model that was an approximation to the defined boundary control model was defined. It was shown that the state solution of the approximated model was in the limit equal to the defined boundary control model. Then, a nominally exponentially stable distributed parameter control system has been designed for a natural gas transmission line control model. The control system is a combination of a feedback controller and a distributed parameter Luenberger state observer combined with a feed forward term from the predicted load forecast. Approximate controllability and approximate observability have been shown. It has also been shown that the defined control model is exponentially stabilizable and exponentially detectable. (abstract truncated)}
place = {Norway}
year = {2001}
month = {Jul}
}