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The Swedish mutant barley collection

Abstract

Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1989
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-XA-406
Reference Number:
EDB-01:068945
Resource Relation:
Other Information: The Nordic Barley Catalogue 1989. ISBN 91-87814-00-5. Issued by the Nordic Gene Bank for Agricultural and Horticultural Plants, P.O. Box 41, S-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden; PBD: Jul 1989; Related Information: In: Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34, 36 pages.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DISEASE RESISTANCE; GENOME MUTATIONS; MILDEW; MUTAGENS; PLANT BREEDING; RADIATION INDUCED MUTANTS
OSTI ID:
20181251
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-260X; TRN: XA0101434037432
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 25
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

The Swedish mutant barley collection. IAEA: N. p., 1989. Web.
The Swedish mutant barley collection. IAEA.
1989. "The Swedish mutant barley collection." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20181251,
title = {The Swedish mutant barley collection}
abstractNote = {Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1989}
month = {Jul}
}