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Mutation breeding of pearl millet and sorghum

Abstract

Pearl millet and sorghum are important food and feed crops grown mostly in semi-arid regions of the world. Although there exists a large amount of genetic variability in both species, it does not always satisfy the needs of plant breeders in improving varieties with regard to yield, quality, resistance or environmental adaptation. Plant breeders interested in using induced mutations for variety improvement will find in this review information about the techniques used by others. (author)
Authors:
Hanna, W W [1] 
  1. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, University of Georgia, College of Agricultural Experiment Stations, Coastal Plain Station, Agronomy Department, Tifton, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1982
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-XA-387
Reference Number:
EDB-01:058642
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 54 refs; PBD: Jul 1982; Related Information: Mutation breeding review no. 1
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARID LANDS; DROUGHT RESISTANCE; GENETIC VARIABILITY; MILLET; PLANT BREEDING; PRODUCTIVITY; RADIATION INDUCED MUTANTS; SORGHUM
OSTI ID:
20169545
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0101049024228
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
13 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Hanna, W W. Mutation breeding of pearl millet and sorghum. IAEA: N. p., 1982. Web.
Hanna, W W. Mutation breeding of pearl millet and sorghum. IAEA.
Hanna, W W. 1982. "Mutation breeding of pearl millet and sorghum." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20169545,
title = {Mutation breeding of pearl millet and sorghum}
author = {Hanna, W W}
abstractNote = {Pearl millet and sorghum are important food and feed crops grown mostly in semi-arid regions of the world. Although there exists a large amount of genetic variability in both species, it does not always satisfy the needs of plant breeders in improving varieties with regard to yield, quality, resistance or environmental adaptation. Plant breeders interested in using induced mutations for variety improvement will find in this review information about the techniques used by others. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1982}
month = {Jul}
}