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Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace

Journal Article:

Abstract

The predictive capability of two comprehensive combustion codes, PCGC-3 and FLUENT, to simulate local flame structure and combustion characteristics in a industrial gas-fired, flat-glass furnace is investigated. Model predictions are compared with experimental data from the furnace for profiles of velocity, species concentrations, temperatures, and wall-incident radiative heat flux. Predictions from both codes show agreement with the measured mean velocity profiles and incident radiant flux on the crown. However, significant differences between the code predictions and measurements are observed for the flame-ozone temperatures and species concentrations. The observed discrepancies may be explained by (i) uncertainties in the distributions of mean velocity and turbulence in the portneck, (ii) uncertainties in the port-by-port stoichiometry, (iii) different grid-based approximations to the furnace geometry made in the two codes, (iv) the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry made in the chemical reaction model of both codes, and (v) simplifying assumptions made in the simulations regarding the complex coupling between the combustion space, batch blanket, and melt tank. The study illustrates the critical need for accurate boundary conditions (inlet air and fuel flow distributions, boundary surface temperatures, etc.) and the importance of representative furnace geometry in simulating these complex industrial combustion systems. (Author)
Authors:
Hill, S C; [1]  Webb, B W; McQuay, M Q; [2]  Newbold, J [3] 
  1. Brigham Young Univ., Advanced Combustion Engineering Research Center, Provo, UT (United States)
  2. Brigham Young Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Provo, UT (United States)
  3. Lockheed Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 2000
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-01:042278
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the Institute of Energy; Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 494; Other Information: PBD: Mar 2000
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GAS FURNACES; GLASS INDUSTRY; FLAMES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COMPUTER CODES; AIR POLLUTION; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON MONOXIDE; COMBUSTION
OSTI ID:
20157356
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0144-2600; JINEDX; TRN: GB0011704
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
page(s) 2-11
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Hill, S C, Webb, B W, McQuay, M Q, and Newbold, J. Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace. United Kingdom: N. p., 2000. Web.
Hill, S C, Webb, B W, McQuay, M Q, & Newbold, J. Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace. United Kingdom.
Hill, S C, Webb, B W, McQuay, M Q, and Newbold, J. 2000. "Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_20157356,
title = {Numerical modelling of an industrial glass-melting furnace}
author = {Hill, S C, Webb, B W, McQuay, M Q, and Newbold, J}
abstractNote = {The predictive capability of two comprehensive combustion codes, PCGC-3 and FLUENT, to simulate local flame structure and combustion characteristics in a industrial gas-fired, flat-glass furnace is investigated. Model predictions are compared with experimental data from the furnace for profiles of velocity, species concentrations, temperatures, and wall-incident radiative heat flux. Predictions from both codes show agreement with the measured mean velocity profiles and incident radiant flux on the crown. However, significant differences between the code predictions and measurements are observed for the flame-ozone temperatures and species concentrations. The observed discrepancies may be explained by (i) uncertainties in the distributions of mean velocity and turbulence in the portneck, (ii) uncertainties in the port-by-port stoichiometry, (iii) different grid-based approximations to the furnace geometry made in the two codes, (iv) the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry made in the chemical reaction model of both codes, and (v) simplifying assumptions made in the simulations regarding the complex coupling between the combustion space, batch blanket, and melt tank. The study illustrates the critical need for accurate boundary conditions (inlet air and fuel flow distributions, boundary surface temperatures, etc.) and the importance of representative furnace geometry in simulating these complex industrial combustion systems. (Author)}
journal = {Journal of the Institute of Energy}
issue = {494}
volume = {73}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2000}
month = {Mar}
}