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Secondary vegetation succession on jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada

Abstract

The effects of different harvesting and site preparation methods on competing vegetation were studied in nine jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Six different treatments plus glyphosate herbiciding and no herbiciding were applied: 1) tree-length harvesting followed by trenching, and full-tree harvesting followed by five site preparations, 2) no site preparation, 3) trenching and 4) blading and compaction as well as blading followed by two planting densities, 5) 1.2m and 6) 2m. Competing vegetation was assessed preharvest and years 1, 2, 3, and 5 postharvest. Data was also available from nine juvenile sites as well as nine semimature sites. Data collection consisted of coverage values of each species as well as structural data for main life forms in height classes. Growth and health data of the planted jack pine seedlings were also available. The data was analyzed using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), diversity indices and tabular analysis. Three years after the herbicide application there is no difference between the total coverage in the halfplots that have received herbiciding and those that have not, but an alteration of the relative abundance of species groups has developed; glyphosate herbiciding promotes grasses over shrubs. When no site preparation is applied,  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2000
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SLU-SEKOL-STL-57
Reference Number:
EDB-01:045699
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Examination paper. 26 refs, 14 figs, 6 tabs, 25 appendixes; PBD: 2000
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ECOLOGICAL SUCCESSION; FORESTS; ONTARIO; PINES; HARVESTING; SITE PREPARATION; FORESTRY; HERBICIDES; POPULATION DYNAMICS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA
OSTI ID:
20152208
Research Organizations:
Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Ecology
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1104-1870; TRN: SE0107152
Availability:
Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20152208
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
44 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Tiveau, Daniel. Secondary vegetation succession on jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Sweden: N. p., 2000. Web.
Tiveau, Daniel. Secondary vegetation succession on jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Sweden.
Tiveau, Daniel. 2000. "Secondary vegetation succession on jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada." Sweden.
@misc{etde_20152208,
title = {Secondary vegetation succession on jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada}
author = {Tiveau, Daniel}
abstractNote = {The effects of different harvesting and site preparation methods on competing vegetation were studied in nine jack pine (Pinus banksiana) cutovers in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Six different treatments plus glyphosate herbiciding and no herbiciding were applied: 1) tree-length harvesting followed by trenching, and full-tree harvesting followed by five site preparations, 2) no site preparation, 3) trenching and 4) blading and compaction as well as blading followed by two planting densities, 5) 1.2m and 6) 2m. Competing vegetation was assessed preharvest and years 1, 2, 3, and 5 postharvest. Data was also available from nine juvenile sites as well as nine semimature sites. Data collection consisted of coverage values of each species as well as structural data for main life forms in height classes. Growth and health data of the planted jack pine seedlings were also available. The data was analyzed using detrended correspondence analysis (DCA), diversity indices and tabular analysis. Three years after the herbicide application there is no difference between the total coverage in the halfplots that have received herbiciding and those that have not, but an alteration of the relative abundance of species groups has developed; glyphosate herbiciding promotes grasses over shrubs. When no site preparation is applied, shrubs increase and compete with the seedlings, whose growth is cut in half compared to the ones that have been site prepared by trenching. Five years after blading, and blading plus compaction, there is still very little vegetation in the research plots, but there is no reduction of the survival rate and growth of the jack pine seedlings. More dense planting after this treatment leads to more competing vegetation, probably due to increased availability of moisture. Grasses do not seem to be affected by compaction and pioneer mosses are promoted by this treatment but compaction leads to a significant reduction of the total coverage of competing vegetation coming in.}
place = {Sweden}
year = {2000}
month = {Jul}
}