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The future of industrial CHIP in Germany, including the tertiary sector. Papers

Abstract

In 1998 the electricity production in industrial installations in Germany was about 40 TWh. This accounts for 66% of the total electricity production with CHP plants in Germany. The presentation will analyse the developments for industrial CHP throughout the last 10 years and will try to explain the developments. The difficult situation for the industrial CHP shows up from the sharp decrease of the total installed capacity by about 2000 MW during 1996 and 1998, already in approach of the full liberalisation of the electricity market in Germany, which has resulted in further and even more plant shut downs. Based on a survey of the German Association of Industrial Autoproducers and Energy Consumers (VIK) plants with a total capacity of 500 MW were closed down in 1999, and about 60% of the industrial CHP installation are facing serious economic problems. The presentation will show some sample economic calculations for different types of plants (Coal fired steam turbines, gas turbines, IC-engines). These results will be compared to the actual energy cost structures for industrial customers. Based on large over capacity in power generation, the offered electricity prices for industrial customers tend to be in the range off the operating cost of  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2000
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
ETDE-DE-942
Reference Number:
EDB-01:043415
Resource Relation:
Conference: COGEN Europe's 7. annual conference: The role of energy supply - cogeneration's role in the sustainable development, Brussels (Belgium), 18-20 Oct 2000; Other Information: PBD: 2000
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COGENERATION; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; EUROPEAN UNION; CAPACITY; FUELS; USES; EMISSION; REDUCTION; BIOMASS; INDUSTRY; ECONOMICS; FORECASTING
OSTI ID:
20136703
Research Organizations:
Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: DE01G1050
Availability:
Available to ETDE participating countries only(see www.etde.org); commercial reproduction prohibited; OSTI as DE20136703
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
14 pages
Announcement Date:
May 18, 2001

Citation Formats

Radgen, P, Schmid, C, Mannsbart, W, and Jochem, E. The future of industrial CHIP in Germany, including the tertiary sector. Papers. Germany: N. p., 2000. Web.
Radgen, P, Schmid, C, Mannsbart, W, & Jochem, E. The future of industrial CHIP in Germany, including the tertiary sector. Papers. Germany.
Radgen, P, Schmid, C, Mannsbart, W, and Jochem, E. 2000. "The future of industrial CHIP in Germany, including the tertiary sector. Papers." Germany.
@misc{etde_20136703,
title = {The future of industrial CHIP in Germany, including the tertiary sector. Papers}
author = {Radgen, P, Schmid, C, Mannsbart, W, and Jochem, E}
abstractNote = {In 1998 the electricity production in industrial installations in Germany was about 40 TWh. This accounts for 66% of the total electricity production with CHP plants in Germany. The presentation will analyse the developments for industrial CHP throughout the last 10 years and will try to explain the developments. The difficult situation for the industrial CHP shows up from the sharp decrease of the total installed capacity by about 2000 MW during 1996 and 1998, already in approach of the full liberalisation of the electricity market in Germany, which has resulted in further and even more plant shut downs. Based on a survey of the German Association of Industrial Autoproducers and Energy Consumers (VIK) plants with a total capacity of 500 MW were closed down in 1999, and about 60% of the industrial CHP installation are facing serious economic problems. The presentation will show some sample economic calculations for different types of plants (Coal fired steam turbines, gas turbines, IC-engines). These results will be compared to the actual energy cost structures for industrial customers. Based on large over capacity in power generation, the offered electricity prices for industrial customers tend to be in the range off the operating cost of the industrial CHP plants. One way out of this dilemma is sometimes the outsourcing and contracting of CHP installations, which has been and still is a growing business in Germany, and utilities regard these options as a possibility to keep their industrial customers. (orig.)}
place = {Germany}
year = {2000}
month = {Jul}
}