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Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS

Abstract

Despite the great international interest in Chernobyl and the need for quantitative risk information on the carcinogenic effectiveness of the radio iodines, there has been relatively little epidemiological research on thyroid cancer following the Chernobyl accident. The reasons for this are many, diverse, and difficult to eliminate, although some progress is being made. Among them are the natural priority of public health concerns, a weak infrastructure for conducting studies in chronic disease epidemiology, and the difficulty of assigning thyroid dose estimates to individuals for study. In spite of the difficulties a number of significant studies have been begun or are planned, and several valuable reports have appeared. From the descriptive studies it is now known that the latent period for thyroid cancer in children exposed to radio iodines is not 5 to 10, but probably three years, that the magnitude of the increase in thyroid cancer among children is beyond anything previously experienced or expected, and that there is a strong correlation between thyroid cancer and environmental radiocesium contamination levels in the Gomel region of Belarus, and between thyroid cancer and average regional levels of I{sup 131} dose to the thyroid in Ukraine. However, even today, there is very little  More>>
Authors:
Beebe, G W [1] 
  1. National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1996
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-BY-020
Reference Number:
EDB-01:001535
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. international conference on 'The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident', Minsk (Belarus), 18-22 Mar 1996; Other Information: 19 refs; PBD: 1996; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the first international conference 'The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident', by Karaoglou, A.; Desmet, G.; Kelly, G.N.; Menzel, H.G. [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)], 1192 pages.
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BELARUS; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; CONTAMINATION; EPIDEMIOLOGY; NEOPLASMS; PUBLIC HEALTH; THYROID
Sponsoring Organizations:
European Commission (EC)
OSTI ID:
20112805
Research Organizations:
European Commission, Brussels (Belgium); Ministry for Emergency, Minsk (Belarus); Ministry for Emergency, Kiev (Ukraine); Ministry for Emergency, Mocsow (Russian Federation)
Country of Origin:
Belarus
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1018-5593; TRN: BY0000289056918
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 731-740
Announcement Date:
Jan 16, 2001

Citation Formats

Beebe, G W. Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS. Belarus: N. p., 1996. Web.
Beebe, G W. Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS. Belarus.
Beebe, G W. 1996. "Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS." Belarus.
@misc{etde_20112805,
title = {Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS}
author = {Beebe, G W}
abstractNote = {Despite the great international interest in Chernobyl and the need for quantitative risk information on the carcinogenic effectiveness of the radio iodines, there has been relatively little epidemiological research on thyroid cancer following the Chernobyl accident. The reasons for this are many, diverse, and difficult to eliminate, although some progress is being made. Among them are the natural priority of public health concerns, a weak infrastructure for conducting studies in chronic disease epidemiology, and the difficulty of assigning thyroid dose estimates to individuals for study. In spite of the difficulties a number of significant studies have been begun or are planned, and several valuable reports have appeared. From the descriptive studies it is now known that the latent period for thyroid cancer in children exposed to radio iodines is not 5 to 10, but probably three years, that the magnitude of the increase in thyroid cancer among children is beyond anything previously experienced or expected, and that there is a strong correlation between thyroid cancer and environmental radiocesium contamination levels in the Gomel region of Belarus, and between thyroid cancer and average regional levels of I{sup 131} dose to the thyroid in Ukraine. However, even today, there is very little hard scientific information on the relation of thyroid cancer in children and their exposure to the radio iodines in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. This is information that only well-designed scientific epidemiological studies, based on firm dose estimates, could be expected to provide. With that purpose in mind, the US has planned with Belarus and Ukraine long-term cohort studies of many thousands of subjects with thyroid activity measurements.}
place = {Belarus}
year = {1996}
month = {Jul}
}