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Quantum information

Journal Article:

Abstract

There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1998
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-00:079513
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physics World; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Country of input: IAEA; PBD: Mar 1998
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMPUTERS; INFORMATION THEORY; QUANTUM MECHANICS
OSTI ID:
20087107
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0953-8585; PHWOEW; TRN: GB00$1104039411
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
vp.
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Rodgers, P. Quantum information. United Kingdom: N. p., 1998. Web.
Rodgers, P. Quantum information. United Kingdom.
Rodgers, P. 1998. "Quantum information." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_20087107,
title = {Quantum information}
author = {Rodgers, P}
abstractNote = {There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)}
journal = {Physics World}
issue = {3}
volume = {11}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1998}
month = {Mar}
}