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Minor and trace elements in human bones and teeth

Abstract

Chemical elements play a great role in the metabolism of bones and teeth. Some elements are beneficial (F at non toxic concentrations in bones and teeth, supplementation of Cu, Mn and Zn along with Ca to delay or prevent the onset of osteoporosis) and some others (chronic exposure to Pb even at moderate concentrations, and excessive exposures to F as in fluorosis situations) are detrimental for the normal functioning of the skeleton. Knowledge on the roles played by both groups of elements can be enhanced if reliable compositional picture is available for scrutiny. The present survey was undertaken to assess the literature status on chemical composition of bones and teeth, and revealed that much needs to be done in order to have tangible collection of meaningful data. In this context, there is a desperate need for harmonization (types of samples chosen, procedures adopted to process the specimens, and finally the determination of analytes) to generate comparable data. To begin with, it is necessary to develop a bioanalytical protocol that exemplifies the merits and demerits of analyzing bones and teeth. Identification of any particular type of bone as a representative sample for the whole skeleton appears to be a far cry.  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1999
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NAHRES-39
Reference Number:
EDB-00:112852
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs; PBD: 1999
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALUMINIUM; ANTIMONY; BODY COMPOSITION; BORON; BROMINE; CADMIUM; CALCIUM; CESIUM; COBALT; NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; NITROGEN; OXYGEN; PHOSPHORS; PIXE ANALYSIS; POLONIUM; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; SKELETON; TEETH; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS
OSTI ID:
20067517
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nutritional and Health-Related Environmental Studies, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA0054839029996
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
103 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Iyengar, G V, and Tandon, L. Minor and trace elements in human bones and teeth. IAEA: N. p., 1999. Web.
Iyengar, G V, & Tandon, L. Minor and trace elements in human bones and teeth. IAEA.
Iyengar, G V, and Tandon, L. 1999. "Minor and trace elements in human bones and teeth." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20067517,
title = {Minor and trace elements in human bones and teeth}
author = {Iyengar, G V, and Tandon, L}
abstractNote = {Chemical elements play a great role in the metabolism of bones and teeth. Some elements are beneficial (F at non toxic concentrations in bones and teeth, supplementation of Cu, Mn and Zn along with Ca to delay or prevent the onset of osteoporosis) and some others (chronic exposure to Pb even at moderate concentrations, and excessive exposures to F as in fluorosis situations) are detrimental for the normal functioning of the skeleton. Knowledge on the roles played by both groups of elements can be enhanced if reliable compositional picture is available for scrutiny. The present survey was undertaken to assess the literature status on chemical composition of bones and teeth, and revealed that much needs to be done in order to have tangible collection of meaningful data. In this context, there is a desperate need for harmonization (types of samples chosen, procedures adopted to process the specimens, and finally the determination of analytes) to generate comparable data. To begin with, it is necessary to develop a bioanalytical protocol that exemplifies the merits and demerits of analyzing bones and teeth. Identification of any particular type of bone as a representative sample for the whole skeleton appears to be a far cry. Even if such a representative segment of a particular bone is identified, the logistics related to medico-legal (autopsy) and anatomical (biopsy) parameters will prevail as decisive factors. For the sake of gaining a comprehensive insight into the distribution of various trace elements in different types of bones, it is necessary to carry out controlled investigations on different types of bones (and cortical and trabecular segments from the same sources) from the same cadaver under well defined sampling conditions. On the analytical side, development of hard tissue RMs for whole bone, as well as for cortical, trabecular and marrow segments separately, would be very helpful for future investigations. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1999}
month = {Jul}
}