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Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation

Abstract

Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)
Authors:
Sullivan, A H [1] 
  1. CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Jun 05, 1989
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
CERN/TIS-RP-89-07
Reference Number:
EDB-00:109063
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 19 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs; PBD: 5 Jun 1989
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CARCINOGENESIS; DOSE LIMITS; LOW DOSE IRRADIATION; MORTALITY; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; RISK ASSESSMENT
OSTI ID:
20058935
Research Organizations:
European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), European Laboratory for Particle Physics, Geneva (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA00XC015020945
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
18 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Sullivan, A H. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation. IAEA: N. p., 1989. Web.
Sullivan, A H. Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation. IAEA.
Sullivan, A H. 1989. "Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation." IAEA.
@misc{etde_20058935,
title = {Write up of TIS seminar on effects of low doses of radiation}
author = {Sullivan, A H}
abstractNote = {Data that was presented at two recent conferences on the effects on humans of low levels of radiation, as well as data that has been used by the ICRP when setting dose limits is reviewed. The data comes from cancer mortality studies of A-bomb survivors and radiation workers, as well as from studies on populations exposed to varying levels of naturally occurring radiation. The problems of using the data to make realistic risk projections on which radiation safety norms can be based are discussed. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1989}
month = {Jun}
}