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Report on combating of illicit trafficking. The Illicit Trafficking Combat Project Group. January 2000

Abstract

The objective of this study is to propose improvements of different means and methods for the prevention of illicit trafficking and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. An essential requirement imposed on authorities and operators through basic nuclear legislation is the establishment and implementation of: a) nuclear material accountancy and control; b) physical protection of nuclear material and facilities; and c) export/import control of nuclear material and, so called, dual-use items. The legislation would make it possible for the State nuclear authority to be informed continuously about the location and quantity of nuclear material in the country, and to monitor that it is under satisfactory protection and guard in accordance with the requirements. The introduction of requirements on licensing of practices and activities involving dual-use items, and other products used for nuclear weapons manufacturing, would also give the authority the possibility to prevent unauthorised transfers of such products. The nuclear legislation must clearly stipulate the distribution of responsibilities between nuclear authority, operator and employees. This would give a solid basis for attaining high safety culture, including positive motivation and active commitment among executives and other employees. It would also ensure that nuclear material would not be lost through negligence or internal  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 2000
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SKI-R-00-3
Reference Number:
EDB-00:108588
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 2000
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY; NUCLEAR MATERIALS DIVERSION; ON-SITE INSPECTION; PROLIFERATION
OSTI ID:
20052142
Research Organizations:
Ministry of Environmental Protection and Regional Development of the Republic of Latvia (Latvia); Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1104-1374; TRN: SE0000132016519
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form; Also available as a PDF-document at the SKI homepage (www.ski.se)
Submitting Site:
SWDN
Size:
158 pages
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Report on combating of illicit trafficking. The Illicit Trafficking Combat Project Group. January 2000. Sweden: N. p., 2000. Web.
Report on combating of illicit trafficking. The Illicit Trafficking Combat Project Group. January 2000. Sweden.
2000. "Report on combating of illicit trafficking. The Illicit Trafficking Combat Project Group. January 2000." Sweden.
@misc{etde_20052142,
title = {Report on combating of illicit trafficking. The Illicit Trafficking Combat Project Group. January 2000}
abstractNote = {The objective of this study is to propose improvements of different means and methods for the prevention of illicit trafficking and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. An essential requirement imposed on authorities and operators through basic nuclear legislation is the establishment and implementation of: a) nuclear material accountancy and control; b) physical protection of nuclear material and facilities; and c) export/import control of nuclear material and, so called, dual-use items. The legislation would make it possible for the State nuclear authority to be informed continuously about the location and quantity of nuclear material in the country, and to monitor that it is under satisfactory protection and guard in accordance with the requirements. The introduction of requirements on licensing of practices and activities involving dual-use items, and other products used for nuclear weapons manufacturing, would also give the authority the possibility to prevent unauthorised transfers of such products. The nuclear legislation must clearly stipulate the distribution of responsibilities between nuclear authority, operator and employees. This would give a solid basis for attaining high safety culture, including positive motivation and active commitment among executives and other employees. It would also ensure that nuclear material would not be lost through negligence or internal criminal activities. A further step of improvements on the national level, would be the urgent and firm introduction of modern Quality Assurance and Internal Control Systems into all forms of nuclear activities. In modern, safety related quality control systems, the operator alone is responsible for all activities and operations, and he must establish an internal control that will ensure that the authority's rules and requirements are thoroughly implemented and adhered to. The operator's organisation, including competence and procedures, must be approved by the State authority. By means of spot-checks, the authority can then convince itself that the operator is fulfilling the requirements. The legislation should also impose heavy sanctions and penalties for all criminal activities related to illicit trafficking. As a direct measure to combat illicit trafficking on the national level, the State supervisory and law enforcement authorities should establish co-operation between themselves and with authorities in other countries and international organisations. Special national committees for combating illicit trafficking should be set up and should use intelligence and open sources information. Regions of States should investigate and implement joint task forces for combating illicit trafficking. Improvements on the International level by the IAEA: The IAEA should assist States in the practical implementation of measures and means for combating illicit trafficking and for the evaluation of threat scenarios. To improve that process in an efficient way, the IAEA should apply the principle of public access to information on its operations to a greater extent. Among other measures for promoting the development of more efficient tools and systems for combating illicit trafficking, the IAEA should: in assisting States, establish rules about duties and responsibilities for operators, authorities and individuals in the NPT area, through appropriate documentation; promote assistance programmes to States in consultation with NPT States, as need may be, of technical equipment and competent staff for the combating of illicit trafficking; provide experts and establish standards and procedures, across borders, for the investigation of serious cases of illicit trafficking, in consultation with national and international nuclear and law enforcement authorities and organisations; incorporate a more modern safeguards inspection technique of the national systems for accountancy and control, in accordance with standards and procedures that were intended to be established on the basis of the Additional Protocol. This would allow the IAEA to allocate more resources for combating illicit trafficking. Concerning the basic requirements on combating illicit trafficking, it is observed that appropriate nuclear legislation has not been introduced in several countries. Some countries have the necessary legislation, but with a poor implementation and supervision of its adherence. With the purpose to effectively change this unsatisfactory situation, this study suggests, that a new international regime should be established by the Untied Nations and be assigned the task to: define the set of requirements and recommendations to be implemented in States for the effective combating of illicit trafficking, and to promote and pursue the implementation of and adherence to them; develop and establish a follow-up and audit system, with the purpose to review the implementation of those requirements and recommendations; carry out audits; (abstract truncated)}
place = {Sweden}
year = {2000}
month = {Jan}
}