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Pursuing transparency through science courts

Abstract

Many, disappointed with traditional ways to assess and manage health, safety and environmental risks, have sought alternatives that might better serve democratic values and truth. Arthur Kantrowitz proposed one in 1967. Named the 'Science Court' by the media, it sought to air opposing viewpoints publicly before an independent, neutral and technically competent panel of scientists. The idea has received considerable attention over the years, but some see it as too opaque and elitist. Ironically, others may view it as too transparent. Beyond that, as proposed it might have been too time-consuming and expensive, and few scientists would have welcomed a suggestion for cross-examination. Yet, its key features still offer promise for resolving difficult policy disputes and might be usefully integrated with notions since leading to the creation and endorsement of advisory science boards.
Authors:
Field, Jr, Thomas G [1] 
  1. Franklin Pierce Law Center, Concord, NH (United States)
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1999
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
NEI-SE-308
Reference Number:
EDB-00:108546
Resource Relation:
Conference: VALDOR: Values in decisions on risk. Symposium in the RISCOM programme addressing transparency in risk assessment and decision making, Stockholm (Sweden), 13-17 Jun 1999; Other Information: 34 refs; PBD: Dec 1999; Related Information: In: VALDOR. Values in decisions on risk. Proceedings, by Andersson, Kjell [ed.] [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden)], 433 pages.
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DECISION MAKING; DISPUTE SETTLEMENTS; HEARINGS; POLITICAL ASPECTS; RISK ASSESSMENT
OSTI ID:
20052095
Research Organizations:
European Commission (Luxembourg). Directorate-General XI Environment, Nuclear Safety and Civil Protection; Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: SE0000108016472
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
SWDN
Size:
page(s) 228-234
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Field, Jr, Thomas G. Pursuing transparency through science courts. Sweden: N. p., 1999. Web.
Field, Jr, Thomas G. Pursuing transparency through science courts. Sweden.
Field, Jr, Thomas G. 1999. "Pursuing transparency through science courts." Sweden.
@misc{etde_20052095,
title = {Pursuing transparency through science courts}
author = {Field, Jr, Thomas G}
abstractNote = {Many, disappointed with traditional ways to assess and manage health, safety and environmental risks, have sought alternatives that might better serve democratic values and truth. Arthur Kantrowitz proposed one in 1967. Named the 'Science Court' by the media, it sought to air opposing viewpoints publicly before an independent, neutral and technically competent panel of scientists. The idea has received considerable attention over the years, but some see it as too opaque and elitist. Ironically, others may view it as too transparent. Beyond that, as proposed it might have been too time-consuming and expensive, and few scientists would have welcomed a suggestion for cross-examination. Yet, its key features still offer promise for resolving difficult policy disputes and might be usefully integrated with notions since leading to the creation and endorsement of advisory science boards.}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1999}
month = {Dec}
}