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Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides

Abstract

It is estimated that the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Agriculture will spend up to 300 billion federal dollars on environmental remediation during the next century. Current remediation processes can be expensive, non-aesthetic, and non-versatile. Therefore, the need exists for more innovative and cost effective solutions. Phytoremediation, the use of vegetation for the remediation of contaminated sediments, soils, and ground water, is an emerging technology for treating several categories of persistent, toxic contaminants. Although effective, phytoremediation is still in a developmental stage, and therefore is not a widely accepted technology by regulatory agencies and public groups. Research is currently being conducted to validate the processes effectiveness as well as increase regulatory and community acceptance. This research will focus on the ability of plants to treat an aquifer contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Specifically, the effectiveness of hydroponically grown dwarf sunflowers and mustard seed will be investigated.
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1998
Product Type:
Conference
Reference Number:
EDB-00:009724
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1998 National Conference on Environmental Engineering, Chicago, IL (US), 06/07/1998--06/10/1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: In: Water resources and the urban environment--98, by Wilson, T.E. [ed.], 754 pages.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HYDROPONIC CULTURE; PLANTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; AQUIFERS; PERFORMANCE; CADMIUM; CESIUM; NICKEL; CHROMIUM; UPTAKE
OSTI ID:
20014949
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Akron, OH (US)
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 0-7844-0349-X; TRN: US0001237
Availability:
American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Reston, VA 20191-4400 (US); $89.00. Prices may become outdated.
Submitting Site:
DELTA
Size:
page(s) 688-693
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Hartong, J, Szpak, J, Hamric, T, and Cutright, T. Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Hartong, J, Szpak, J, Hamric, T, & Cutright, T. Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. United States.
Hartong, J, Szpak, J, Hamric, T, and Cutright, T. 1998. "Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides." United States.
@misc{etde_20014949,
title = {Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides}
author = {Hartong, J, Szpak, J, Hamric, T, and Cutright, T}
abstractNote = {It is estimated that the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Agriculture will spend up to 300 billion federal dollars on environmental remediation during the next century. Current remediation processes can be expensive, non-aesthetic, and non-versatile. Therefore, the need exists for more innovative and cost effective solutions. Phytoremediation, the use of vegetation for the remediation of contaminated sediments, soils, and ground water, is an emerging technology for treating several categories of persistent, toxic contaminants. Although effective, phytoremediation is still in a developmental stage, and therefore is not a widely accepted technology by regulatory agencies and public groups. Research is currently being conducted to validate the processes effectiveness as well as increase regulatory and community acceptance. This research will focus on the ability of plants to treat an aquifer contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Specifically, the effectiveness of hydroponically grown dwarf sunflowers and mustard seed will be investigated.}
place = {United States}
year = {1998}
month = {Jul}
}