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Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center

Conference:

Abstract

This paper presents current NASA biomedical developments and applications using thermoelectrics. Discussion will include future technology enhancements that would be most beneficial to the application of thermoelectric technology. A great deal of thermoelectric applications have focused on electronic cooling. As with all technological developments within NASA, if the application cannot be related to the average consumer, the technology will not be mass-produced and widely available to the public (a key to research and development expenditures and thermoelectric companies). Included are discussions of thermoelectric applications to cool astronauts during launch and reentry. The earth-based applications, or spin-offs, include such innovations as tank and race car driver cooling, to cooling infants with high temperatures, as well as, the prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy. In order to preserve the scientific value of metabolic samples during long-term space missions, cooling is required to enable scientific studies. Results of one such study should provide a better understanding of osteoporosis and may lead to a possible cure for the disease. In the space environment, noise has to be kept to a minimum. In long-term space applications such as the International Space Station, thermoelectric technology provides the acoustic relief and the reliability for food, as well  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Reference Number:
EDB-00:007313
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1997 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting, San Francisco, CA (US), 03/31/1997--04/03/1997; Other Information: Single article reprints are available through University Microfilms Inc., 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106; PBD: 1997; Related Information: In: Thermoelectric materials -- New directions and approaches. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 478, by Tritt, T.M.; Kanatzidis, M.G.; Lyon, H.B. Jr.; Mahan, G.D. [eds.], 359 pages.
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; THERMOELECTRIC COOLERS; USES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; THERMOELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS; NASA
OSTI ID:
20014272
Research Organizations:
NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (US)
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 1-55899-382-7; TRN: IM200012%%200
Availability:
Materials Research Society, 506 Keystone Drive, Warrendale, PA 15086 (US); $71.00. Prices may become outdated.
Submitting Site:
DELTA
Size:
page(s) 309-314
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Kramer, C D. Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Kramer, C D. Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center. United States.
Kramer, C D. 1997. "Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center." United States.
@misc{etde_20014272,
title = {Thermoelectric applications as related to biomedical engineering for NASA Johnson Space Center}
author = {Kramer, C D}
abstractNote = {This paper presents current NASA biomedical developments and applications using thermoelectrics. Discussion will include future technology enhancements that would be most beneficial to the application of thermoelectric technology. A great deal of thermoelectric applications have focused on electronic cooling. As with all technological developments within NASA, if the application cannot be related to the average consumer, the technology will not be mass-produced and widely available to the public (a key to research and development expenditures and thermoelectric companies). Included are discussions of thermoelectric applications to cool astronauts during launch and reentry. The earth-based applications, or spin-offs, include such innovations as tank and race car driver cooling, to cooling infants with high temperatures, as well as, the prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy. In order to preserve the scientific value of metabolic samples during long-term space missions, cooling is required to enable scientific studies. Results of one such study should provide a better understanding of osteoporosis and may lead to a possible cure for the disease. In the space environment, noise has to be kept to a minimum. In long-term space applications such as the International Space Station, thermoelectric technology provides the acoustic relief and the reliability for food, as well as, scientific refrigeration/freezers. Applications and future needs are discussed as NASA moves closer to a continued space presence in Mir, International Space Station, and Lunar-Mars Exploration.}
place = {United States}
year = {1997}
month = {Jul}
}