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Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs

Abstract

Industries that use add-on control devices must adequately capture emissions before delivering them to the control device. One way to capture emissions is to use permanent total enclosures (PTEs). By definition, an enclosure which meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's five-point criteria is a PTE and has a capture efficiency of 100%. Since costs play an important role in regulatory development, in selection of control equipment, and in control technology evaluations for permitting purposes, EPA has developed a Control Cost Manual for estimating costs of various items of control equipment. EPA's Manual does not contain any methodology for estimating PTE costs. In order to assist environmental regulators and potential users of PTEs, a methodology for estimating PTE costs was developed under contract with EPA, by Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. (PES) and is the subject of this paper. The methodology for estimating PTE costs follows the approach used for other control devices in the Manual. It includes procedures for sizing various components of a PTE and for estimating capital as well as annual costs. It contains verification procedures for demonstrating compliance with EPA's five-point criteria. In addition, procedures are included to determine compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards.  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1999
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-990608-
Reference Number:
EDB-00:005186
Resource Relation:
Conference: Air and Waste 92nd Annual Meeting and Exhibition, St. Louis, MO (US), 06/20/1999--06/24/1999; Other Information: 1 CD-ROM. Operating Systems: Windows 3.1, '95, '98 and NT; Macintosh; and UNIX; PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Air and Waste 92nd annual meeting and exhibition proceedings, [9500] pages.
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; WASTE MANAGEMENT; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; COST ESTIMATION; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT
OSTI ID:
20006544
Research Organizations:
Pacific Environmental Services, Inc., Herndon, VA (US)
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: IM200008%%151
Availability:
Air and Waste Management Association, One Gateway Center, Third Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (US); $149.95. Prices may become outdated.
Submitting Site:
DELTA
Size:
vp., Paper 99.483
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Lukey, M E, Prasad, C, Toothman, D A, and Kaplan, N. Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Lukey, M E, Prasad, C, Toothman, D A, & Kaplan, N. Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs. United States.
Lukey, M E, Prasad, C, Toothman, D A, and Kaplan, N. 1999. "Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs." United States.
@misc{etde_20006544,
title = {Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs}
author = {Lukey, M E, Prasad, C, Toothman, D A, and Kaplan, N}
abstractNote = {Industries that use add-on control devices must adequately capture emissions before delivering them to the control device. One way to capture emissions is to use permanent total enclosures (PTEs). By definition, an enclosure which meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's five-point criteria is a PTE and has a capture efficiency of 100%. Since costs play an important role in regulatory development, in selection of control equipment, and in control technology evaluations for permitting purposes, EPA has developed a Control Cost Manual for estimating costs of various items of control equipment. EPA's Manual does not contain any methodology for estimating PTE costs. In order to assist environmental regulators and potential users of PTEs, a methodology for estimating PTE costs was developed under contract with EPA, by Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. (PES) and is the subject of this paper. The methodology for estimating PTE costs follows the approach used for other control devices in the Manual. It includes procedures for sizing various components of a PTE and for estimating capital as well as annual costs. It contains verification procedures for demonstrating compliance with EPA's five-point criteria. In addition, procedures are included to determine compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Meeting these standards is an important factor in properly designing PTEs. The methodology is encoded in Microsoft Exel spreadsheets to facilitate cost estimation and PTE verification. Examples are given throughout the methodology development and in the spreadsheets to illustrate the PTE design, verification, and cost estimation procedures.}
place = {United States}
year = {1999}
month = {Jul}
}