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Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents

Conference:

Abstract

The US EPA estimates that coal-fired power plants constitute the largest anthropogenic source of mercury emissions in the US. The Agency has contemplated emission regulations for power plants, but the large gas-flow rates and low mercury concentrations involved have made current treatment options prohibitively expensive. ADA Technologies, Inc. (Englewood, Colorado), in conjunction with the US DOE, is developing regenerable sorbents for the removal and recovery of mercury from flue gas. These sorbents are based on the ability of noble metals to amalgamate mercury at typical flue-gas temperatures and release mercury at higher temperatures. The process allows for recovery of mercury with minimal volumes of secondary wastes and no impact on fly ash quality. In 1997 and 1998, ADA tested a 20-cfm sorbent unit at CONSOL Inc.'s coal-combustion test facility in Library, PA. Results from the 1997 tests indicated that the sorbent can remove elemental and oxidized mercury and can be regenerated without loss of capacity. Design changes were implemented in 1998 to enhance the thermal efficiency of the process and to recover the mercury in a stable form. Testing during autumn, 1998 demonstrated 60% to 90% removal efficiency of mercury from a variety of different coals. However, contradictory removal results  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1999
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-990608-
Reference Number:
EDB-00:002206
Resource Relation:
Conference: Air and Waste 92nd Annual Meeting and Exhibition, St. Louis, MO (US), 06/20/1999--06/24/1999; Other Information: 1 CD-ROM. Operating Systems: Windows 3.1, '95, '98 and NT; Macintosh; and UNIX; PBD: 1999; Related Information: In: Air and Waste 92nd annual meeting and exhibition proceedings, [9500] pages.
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COAL; MERCURY; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; WASTE WATER; ADSORBENTS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; FLUE GAS
OSTI ID:
20002206
Research Organizations:
ADA Technologies, Englewood, CO (US)
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: IM200002%%206
Availability:
Air and Waste Management Association, One Gateway Center, Third Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (US); $149.95. Prices may become outdated.
Submitting Site:
DELTA
Size:
vp., Paper 99.121
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Turchi, C S, Albiston, J, Broderick, T E, and Stewart, R M. Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Turchi, C S, Albiston, J, Broderick, T E, & Stewart, R M. Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents. United States.
Turchi, C S, Albiston, J, Broderick, T E, and Stewart, R M. 1999. "Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents." United States.
@misc{etde_20002206,
title = {Removal of mercury from coal-combustion flue gas using regenerable sorbents}
author = {Turchi, C S, Albiston, J, Broderick, T E, and Stewart, R M}
abstractNote = {The US EPA estimates that coal-fired power plants constitute the largest anthropogenic source of mercury emissions in the US. The Agency has contemplated emission regulations for power plants, but the large gas-flow rates and low mercury concentrations involved have made current treatment options prohibitively expensive. ADA Technologies, Inc. (Englewood, Colorado), in conjunction with the US DOE, is developing regenerable sorbents for the removal and recovery of mercury from flue gas. These sorbents are based on the ability of noble metals to amalgamate mercury at typical flue-gas temperatures and release mercury at higher temperatures. The process allows for recovery of mercury with minimal volumes of secondary wastes and no impact on fly ash quality. In 1997 and 1998, ADA tested a 20-cfm sorbent unit at CONSOL Inc.'s coal-combustion test facility in Library, PA. Results from the 1997 tests indicated that the sorbent can remove elemental and oxidized mercury and can be regenerated without loss of capacity. Design changes were implemented in 1998 to enhance the thermal efficiency of the process and to recover the mercury in a stable form. Testing during autumn, 1998 demonstrated 60% to 90% removal efficiency of mercury from a variety of different coals. However, contradictory removal results were obtained at the end of the test period. Subsequent laboratory analyses indicated that the sorbent had lost over half its capacity for mercury due to a decrease in available sites for mercury sorption. The presence of sulfur compounds on the sorbent suggests that thermal cycling may have condensed acid gases on the sorbent leading to deterioration of the active sorption sites. The regeneration time/temperature profile has been altered to minimize this potential in the upcoming power plant tests.}
place = {United States}
year = {1999}
month = {Jul}
}