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Size and importance of small electrical end uses in households

Conference:

Abstract

Miscellaneous end uses (an energy-consumption category in the residential sector) has recently emerged with more importance than ever before. Miscellaneous end uses are a collection of numerous end uses (often unrelated in technology or market characteristics) that individually are small consumers but when grouped together can become notable in size. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998, published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), suggests that about 32% of residential electricity use in 1996 is attributable to miscellaneous end uses (21% from the Other Uses category and 11% from other miscellaneous categories). The EIA predicts this consumption will grow to about 47% of residential electricity use by 2010. Other studies have shown substantial consumption in this category, and forecast substantial future growth as well. However, it is not clear that the current accounting structure of the miscellaneous category is the most appropriate one, nor that the forecast growth in consumption will materialize. A bottom-up study on a collection of miscellaneous electric end uses was performed to better understand this complex, ill-defined category. Initial results show that many end uses can be categorized more appropriately, such as furnace fans, which belong in Space Heating. A recommended categorization reduces the Other Uses category from  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1998
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-980815-
Reference Number:
EDB-00:001638
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA (US), 08/23/1998--08/28/1998; Other Information: 10 volume set available for $200.00; PBD: 1998; Related Information: In: 1998 ACEEE summer study on energy efficiency in buildings: Proceedings, [3100] pages.
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; RESIDENTIAL SECTOR; ELECTRIC APPLIANCES; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; FORECASTING; CLASSIFICATION; STATISTICAL DATA
Sponsoring Organizations:
USDOE
OSTI ID:
20001971
Research Organizations:
D and R International (US)
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: IM0001%%408
Availability:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 801, Washington, DC 20036 (US)
Submitting Site:
DELTA
Size:
page(s) 1.1-1.17
Announcement Date:
Feb 01, 2000

Conference:

Citation Formats

Broderick, J R, Zogg, R A, and Alberino, D L. Size and importance of small electrical end uses in households. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Broderick, J R, Zogg, R A, & Alberino, D L. Size and importance of small electrical end uses in households. United States.
Broderick, J R, Zogg, R A, and Alberino, D L. 1998. "Size and importance of small electrical end uses in households." United States.
@misc{etde_20001971,
title = {Size and importance of small electrical end uses in households}
author = {Broderick, J R, Zogg, R A, and Alberino, D L}
abstractNote = {Miscellaneous end uses (an energy-consumption category in the residential sector) has recently emerged with more importance than ever before. Miscellaneous end uses are a collection of numerous end uses (often unrelated in technology or market characteristics) that individually are small consumers but when grouped together can become notable in size. The Annual Energy Outlook 1998, published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), suggests that about 32% of residential electricity use in 1996 is attributable to miscellaneous end uses (21% from the Other Uses category and 11% from other miscellaneous categories). The EIA predicts this consumption will grow to about 47% of residential electricity use by 2010. Other studies have shown substantial consumption in this category, and forecast substantial future growth as well. However, it is not clear that the current accounting structure of the miscellaneous category is the most appropriate one, nor that the forecast growth in consumption will materialize. A bottom-up study on a collection of miscellaneous electric end uses was performed to better understand this complex, ill-defined category. Initial results show that many end uses can be categorized more appropriately, such as furnace fans, which belong in Space Heating. A recommended categorization reduces the Other Uses category from 21% to 12% of electric consumption estimated in 1996. Thus, the consumption from miscellaneous end uses is not nearly as large as thought. Furthermore, the growth rate associated with small end uses is projected to be lower relative to projections from other sources.}
place = {United States}
year = {1998}
month = {Jul}
}