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Scanning probe microscopy

Journal Article:

Abstract

In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, `because we are too big`. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs.
Authors:
Mainsbridge, B [1] 
  1. Murdoch Univ., WA (Australia). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1994
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 440101; PA: AIX-26:074205; EDB-96:009856; SN: 96001508400
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Forum; Journal Volume: 18; Other Information: PBD: 1994
Subject:
44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; ELECTRON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SURFACE PROPERTIES; BINDING ENERGY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; IMAGES; REVIEWS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPECIFICATIONS; THREE-DIMENSIONAL CALCULATIONS; TUNNELING
OSTI ID:
149282
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: MFOREM; ISSN 0160-7952; TRN: AU9514814074205
Submitting Site:
AUN
Size:
pp. 77-84
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Mainsbridge, B. Scanning probe microscopy. Australia: N. p., 1994. Web.
Mainsbridge, B. Scanning probe microscopy. Australia.
Mainsbridge, B. 1994. "Scanning probe microscopy." Australia.
@misc{etde_149282,
title = {Scanning probe microscopy}
author = {Mainsbridge, B}
abstractNote = {In late 1959, Richard Feynman observed that manoeuvring atoms was something that could be done in principle but has not been done, `because we are too big`. In 1982, the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented and is now a central tool for the construction of nanoscale devices in what was known as molecular engineering, and now, nanotechnology. The principles of the microscope are outlined and references are made to other scanning devices which have evolved from the original invention. The method of employment of the STM as a machine tool is described and references are made to current speculations on applications of the instrument in nanotechnology. A short bibliography on this topic is included. 27 refs., 7 figs.}
journal = {Materials Forum}
volume = {18}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Australia}
year = {1994}
month = {Dec}
}